Baobab Veggie Balls with Sweet Potato and Beet

Baobab adds a new twist to the veggie burger. We hope you enjoy these savory non-meat balls as much as we do!

Ingredients:
  • 1 medium sweet potato
  • 1 medium carrot
  • 2 packed grated medium sized beetroot
  • ½ c finely chopped red onion
  • 1 clove garlic, finely chopped
  • ¼ tsp chili powder
  • ½ tsp cumin powder
  • 1 tsp dried dill
  • 2 tbsp corn flour
  • 2 tbsp baobab
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Baobab Veggie Balls with Sweet Potato and Beet

Baobab adds a new twist to the veggie burger. We hope you enjoy these savory non-meat balls as much as we do!

Ingredients:

  • 1 medium sweet potato
  • 1 medium carrot
  • 2 packed grated medium sized beetroot
  • ½ c finely chopped red onion
  • 1 clove garlic, finely chopped
  • ¼ tsp chili powder
  • ½ tsp cumin powder
  • 1 tsp dried dill
  • 2 tbsp corn flour
  • 2 tbsp baobab
  • salt to taste
    Baobab Veggie Balls

    Method:

    1. Heat a teaspoon of coconut oil in a cast iron skillet and add in the chopped red onion and garlic. Sauté until the red onions are translucent.

    2. Add in the grated beetroot, sweet potato, and carrot, cumin, salt, chili powder,and dill. Cover the pan and simmer on low heat until the beetroot and sweet potato have turned soft.

    3. Turn off the heat and allow the mixture to cool completely. Once cooled, add in the corn flour and baobab powder.

    4. Make small lime sized balls or go big with a burger. You can cook them by baking for 30 minutes at 375 degrees or pan fry them up in a low heat.

Baobab is a superfruit that has great things, like antioxidants,dietary fiber,vitamin C, vitamin B, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. The fruit – a big, coconut looking thing – comes from Africa’s picturesque baobab tree, known as the “Tree of Life.

One serving (about 2 tablespoons) contains 24% of your daily recommended dietary fiber and 25% of the daily recommended Vitamin C. And if that wasn’t enough, the fiber in the Baobab fruit pulp acts as a prebiotic – helping your gut grow its good bacteria so that you can better absorb nutrients. And it’s extremely alkaline with a PRAL value of -52. Its tangy and slightly sweet taste works well in smoothies, tomato sauce, desserts, and many other foods.


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Mango & Coconut Baobab Tarts

Another delicious dessert made healthier with Baobab from @nourishingamelia. Enjoy! Ingredients: Base

  • 1 cup pecans
  • 3/4 cup ground almonds
  • 10 medjool dates
Filling
  • 2 cups fresh mango
  • 1/2 block coconut cream
  • 3 tbsp maple syrup
  • 1 tbsp coconut oil
  • 2 tbsp Baobab Powder
  • Sprinkling of shredded coconut for decoration (optional)
Method Place all the base ingredients

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Another delicious dessert made healthier with Baobab from @nourishingamelia. Enjoy!

Ingredients:

Base

  • 1 cup pecans
  • 3/4 cup ground almonds
  • 10 medjool dates

Filling

  • 2 cups fresh mango
  • 1/2 block coconut cream
  • 3 tbsp maple syrup
  • 1 tbsp coconut oil
  • 2 tbsp Baobab Powder
  • Sprinkling of shredded coconut for decoration (optional)

Method

Place all the base ingredients into your food processor and blitz until everything is combined together. You’ll be left with a sticky mixture. Press the mixture into mini tart tins (you should make about 6). Then, place the tart tins into the freezer for 45 minutes.

To make the filling, add the ingredients to a food processor and blend until you get a creamy, thick consistency. After 45 minutes, remove the tart tins from the freezer and add the filling into the base of the tarts. Sprinkle shredded coconut on top if you want a bit of extra decoration and deliciousness!

Place back into the freezer for half an hour to let the tarts set.

Remove the tarts from the freezer and let them thaw for 5 minutes before serving. These tarts will last 2-3 days if kept in an airtight container in the fridge.

Baobab is a superfruit that has great things, like antioxidants,dietary fiber,vitamin C, vitamin B, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. The fruit – a big, coconut looking thing – comes from Africa’s picturesque baobab tree, known as the “Tree of Life.

One serving (about 2 tablespoons) contains 24% of your daily recommended dietary fiber and 25% of the daily recommended Vitamin C. And if that wasn’t enough, the fiber in the Baobab fruit pulp acts as a prebiotic – helping your gut grow its good bacteria so that you can better absorb nutrients. And it’s extremely alkaline with a PRAL value of -52. Its tangy and slightly sweet taste works well in smoothies, tomato sauce, desserts, and many other foods.


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Raw Cacao Baobab Energy Bars with Moringa

Combining two African superfoods - Baobab and Moringa - these bars are great to take on a hike or to just keep at the desk.

Ingredients

For the base:

  • 1 and 1/2 cups of raw soaked nuts: We used cashews, pecans and almonds are great too!
  • 1 cup or less of pitted dates
  • 1 cup or less dried, unsweetened cherries (or dried dehydrated fruit of choice)
  • 2 tbsp raw, shelled hemp seeds
  • 1 tbsp of Moringa powder
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Raw Cacao Baobab Energy Bars with Moringa

Combining two African superfoods – Baobab and Moringa – these bars are great to take on a hike or to just keep at the desk.

Ingredients

For the base:

  • 1 and 1/2 cups of raw soaked nuts: We used cashews, pecans and almonds are great too!
  • 1 cup or less of pitted dates
  • 1 cup or less dried, unsweetened cherries (or dried dehydrated fruit of choice)
  • 2 tbsp raw, shelled hemp seeds
  • 1 tbsp of Moringa powder
  • 2 tbsp of Baobab Powder

For the cacao topping:

  • 1/2 cup cacao nibs
  • 2 tbsp finely ground coffee
  • 1 and a half tbsp of raw coconut butter
  • 1/2 tbsp or raw honey

*for extra creaminess, add more coconut butter and/or honey. Alternatives: handful of cashews or half an avocado

After soaking the nuts, add them to the food processor and grind until they’ve been finely ground. Add in the dates, then cherries, baobab and moringa powder and blend until the consistency is smooth and sticky. Add in the hemp seeds with only a few pulses (they don’t need to be too deeply ground). Take your base and press into whatever dish you’re using: shallow pie pan, cupcake molds, or even just a plate.

Add all topping ingredients to the food processor. Continue to pulse until the nibs are at a desired consistency. For a much smoother, creamier topping, add more coconut butter (or listed alternatives) until it’s the density of a smoothie. For a crunchier bite, let up on a pulsing so that the nibs are aren’t completely ground. Add more honey or a few dates if you don’t find it sweet enough. However, because the base is so sweet try to leave the topping less so. Pour, or spread, atop your base. Freeze for a hour or refrigerate for longer. The bars should last for about a week!

Baobab is a superfruit that has great things, like antioxidants,dietary fiber, vitamin C, vitamin B, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. The fruit – a big, coconut looking thing – comes from Africa’s picturesque baobab tree, known as the “Tree of Life.

One serving (about 2 tablespoons) contains 24% of your daily recommended dietary fiber and 25% of the daily recommended Vitamin C. And if that wasn’t enough, the fiber in the Baobab fruit pulp acts as a prebiotic – helping your gut grow its good bacteria so that you can better absorb nutrients. And it’s extremely alkaline with a PRAL value of -52. Its tangy and slightly sweet taste works well in smoothies, tomato sauce, desserts, and many other foods.


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Baobab & Blueberry Buckwheat Pancakes

 

Who said pancakes can't be healthy? Add some zing and a nutritional punch to your breakfast by adding Baobab powder to your pancakes.

Ingredients

 

pancakes

Who said pancakes can’t be healthy? Add some zing and a nutritional punch to your breakfast by adding Baobab powder to your pancakes.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup buckwheat flour (100g)
  • 1 cup almond milk (200ml)
  • 2 tbsp flaxseed mixed with 4 tbsp water
  • 1 tbsp baobab powder
  • 1 tbsp maple syrup
  • 1/2 cup blueberries (frozen or fresh)

Baobab Pancakes

Start by making your flax ‘eggs’. Mix the flaxseed and water together in a bowl and leave to thicken up for 5 minutes. Add the buckwheat flour and baobab to a bowl and mix together then add the almond milk, maple syrup, the now thicken flax mixture and blueberries. Stir well. Heat a little coconut oil in a frying pan over a medium heat. Using a large spoon transfer some of the mixture to the pan to make a pancake. After a minute or so the sides of the pancake should begin to brown and little bubbles will appear. At this point flip the pancake over using a spatula and cook for another minute or two on the other side. Repeat these steps until you’ve run out of mixture! You should end up with around 5-6 pancakes to enjoy!

Baobab is a superfruit that has great things, like antioxidants,dietary fibervitamin Cvitamin Bcalciummagnesium, and potassium. The fruit – a big, coconut looking thing – comes from Africa’s picturesque baobab tree, known as the “Tree of Life.

One serving (about 2 tablespoons) contains 24% of your daily recommended dietary fiber and 25% of the daily recommended Vitamin C. And if that wasn’t enough, the fiber in the Baobab fruit pulp acts as a prebiotic – helping your gut grow its good bacteria so that you can better absorb nutrients. And it’s extremely alkaline with a PRAL value of -52. Its tangy and slightly sweet taste works well in smoothies, tomato sauce, desserts, and many other foods.

 


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Zesty Green Baobab Smoothie

Are you adding Baobab into your morning smoothie? The sweet, tart, and tangy taste plus the numerous nutritional benefits - Vitamin C, Dietary Fiber, Antioxidants, and more give a boost to any smoothie. We love this smoothie from our guest chef @nourishingamelia

Ingredients -

smoothie

Are you adding Baobab into your morning smoothie? The sweet, tart, and tangy taste plus the numerous nutritional benefits – Vitamin C, Dietary Fiber, Antioxidants, and more give a boost to any smoothie. We love this smoothie from our guest chef @nourishingamelia

Ingredients –

  • 1 apple
  • 1 stick of celery
  • 2 handfuls of spinach
  • 1 heaping tsp of Baobab powder
  • Juice of half a lime
  • 1 1/2 cups of water (300 ml)

Core and chop your apple. Pour the water into your blender followed by all the other ingredients. Blend until smooth. Pour into a glass and enjoy!!

Baobab is a superfruit that has great things, like antioxidants,dietary fibervitamin Cvitamin Bcalciummagnesium, and potassium. The fruit – a big, coconut looking thing – comes from Africa’s picturesque baobab tree, known as the “Tree of Life.

One serving (about 2 tablespoons) contains 24% of your daily recommended dietary fiber and 25% of the daily recommended Vitamin C. And if that wasn’t enough, the fiber in the Baobab fruit pulp acts as a prebiotic – helping your gut grow its good bacteria so that you can better absorb nutrients. And it’s extremely alkaline with a PRAL value of -52. Its tangy and slightly sweet taste works well in smoothies, tomato sauce, desserts, and many other foods.


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Cacao Orange & Baobab Oatmeal

A sweet and healthy way to start the day! Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup oats (50g)
  • 1 cup almond milk (200ml)
  • 1 heaped tsp baobab
  • 1 tsp honey
  • 1 orange
  • 1 tbsp cacao nibs
  • 1 tbsp chopped almonds (optional)
Steps: 1. Pour the almond milk into a saucepan and place on a medium heat. 2. Once the almond milk has heated (after 3-4 minutes) add the oats, honey and zest of half an orange. Keep the heat on low-medium and stir frequently. 3. Once the oats have absorbed the almond milk and you’ve got your desired consiste

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Cacao Orange & Baobab OatmealA sweet and healthy way to start the day!

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup oats (50g)
  • 1 cup almond milk (200ml)
  • 1 heaped tsp baobab
  • 1 tsp honey
  • 1 orange
  • 1 tbsp cacao nibs
  • 1 tbsp chopped almonds (optional)

Steps:
1. Pour the almond milk into a saucepan and place on a medium heat.
2. Once the almond milk has heated (after 3-4 minutes) add the oats, honey and zest of half an orange. Keep the heat on low-medium and stir frequently.
3. Once the oats have absorbed the almond milk and you’ve got your desired consistency (mine takes about 10 minutes) take off the heat and stir in the baobab.
4. Pour your oatmeal into a bowl then top with chopped orange segments, cacao nibs and chopped almonds if you’re using them – they give a delicious crunch!
5. Dig in and enjoy!


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Lemon Baobab Cheesecake

  Nom nom nom...not only does Baobab fruit pack a nutritional punch (more antioxidants than blueberries, Vitamin C, dietary fiber, etc...), its tart and tangy taste makes for a delicious addition to so many different of recipes. This cheesecake is dairy-free, gluten-free, and full of ingredients that are actually good for you! We love this recipe from our guest chef @nourishingamelia. Ingredients Base - • 1 1/2 cups alm

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Nom nom nom…not only does Baobab fruit pack a nutritional punch (more antioxidants than blueberries, Vitamin C, dietary fiber, etc…), its tart and tangy taste makes for a delicious addition to so many different of recipes. This cheesecake is dairy-free, gluten-free, and full of ingredients that are actually good for you! We love this recipe from our guest chef @nourishingamelia.

Ingredients

Base –

• 1 1/2 cups almonds (200g) 

• 1 1/2 cups medjool dates (approx. 10)

• 2 tbsp coconut oil

Cheesecake filling –

• 2 cups cashews (230g) soaked overnight

1/4 cup (2 tbsp) baobab powder

• 1/3 cup (3 tbsp) coconut oil

• Juice & zest of 2 small-medium lemons 

• 1/4 cup (3 tbsp) pure maple syrup 

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Directions

1. Soak the cashews overnight or for a minimum of 4 hours before making your cheesecake.

2. Place the almonds in a food processor and blitz until broken down, then add in the pitted dates & coconut oil and blend again.

3. Transfer the sticky crust mixture into a cake tin (I used 18inch), spread out evenly and press down so the mixture is nicely compact.

4. Place your cake tin into the freezer while you make the cheesecake filling.

5. Drain the soaked cashews and put them into the food processor along with all the other filling ingredients.

6. Blend until you get a creamy, smooth mixture. This may take a few minutes.

7. Remove the cake tin from the freezer and pour the filling mixture onto the now set crust. Spread evenly.

8. Place the cheesecake back into the freezer for 2 hours to set.

9. After 2 hours you can remove the cheesecake from the freezer, leave it to thaw for 10 minutes then it’s ready to slice and eat!

 

Baobab is a superfruit that has great things, like antioxidants,dietary fibervitamin Cvitamin Bcalciummagnesium, and potassium. The fruit – a big, coconut looking thing – comes from Africa’s picturesque baobab tree, known as the “Tree of Life.

One serving (about 2 tablespoons) contains 24% of your daily recommended dietary fiber and 25% of the daily recommended Vitamin C. And if that wasn’t enough, the fiber in the Baobab fruit pulp acts as a prebiotic – helping your gut grow its good bacteria so that you can better absorb nutrients. And it’s extremely alkaline with a PRAL value of -52. Its tangy and slightly sweet taste works well in smoothies, tomato sauce, desserts, and many other foods.

 


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Cacao & Baobab Superfood Mousse

This chocolate mousse tastes completely decadent, yet is chock-full of superfood goodness. (makes one serving, or two if you don't mind sharing :) ) 2 avocados 3 tablespoons of cacao powder 2 tablespoons of honey 1 tablespoon of Baobab Powder Blend in a food processor and enjoy!  

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Cacao & Baobab Superfood Mousse

This chocolate mousse tastes completely decadent, yet is chock-full of superfood goodness.

(makes one serving, or two if you don’t mind sharing 🙂 )

2 avocados

3 tablespoons of cacao powder

2 tablespoons of honey

1 tablespoon of Baobab Powder

Blend in a food processor and enjoy!

 


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Beet & Baobab Dip

  Did you know there’s a powder you can add to nearly anything to fortify your meals and add antioxidants, vitamin c, dietary fiber, prebiotics, and amino acids? And it’s a real fruit — that dries in its shell — to create a super nutritious sweet, tangy powder. And what’s even more amazing is that the fruit grows on a beautiful, ancient, gnarly tree in Africa, and when harvested, provides much needed income to the communities around it. Baobab fruit powder is just becoming known in the U.S. and is loved by

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Beet & Baobab Dip

Did you know there’s a powder you can add to nearly anything to fortify your meals and add antioxidants, vitamin c, dietary fiber, prebiotics, and amino acids?

And it’s a real fruit — that dries in its shell — to create a super nutritious sweet, tangy powder.

And what’s even more amazing is that the fruit grows on a beautiful, ancient, gnarly tree in Africa, and when harvested, provides much needed income to the communities around it.

Baobab fruit powder is just becoming known in the U.S. and is loved by moms who add it into meals for their kids, by athletes who say it lowers their recovery time, and anyone who is looking for a way to eat healthier.

In February, we’re featuring #29daysofbaobab. We’ll be showcasing recipes, videos, and blogs about our favorite fruit. Follow along on our Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook pages.

Today, we’re featuring a delicious, nutrient-dense beet dip that makes a perfect addition to your Super Bowl spread.

Beet & Baobab Dip (vegan and gluten free)

2 roasted beets
¼ cup of tahini
¼ cup of chickpeas
2 tablespoons of baobab powder
2 cloves of roasted garlic
salt to taste
two oranges orange
zest of one orange
1 tablespoon of cilantro
juice of two lemons

Combine all ingredients in a food processor and blend well. Serve with chips and or veggies.

 


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The World’s Oldest Living Tree – And Its Healing Secrets

When I saw my first Baobab tree in Zimbabwe, I stood in front of it in awe. The tree gave me a “feeling”…I had never even heard of the tree, but upon first glance I knew there was something different about this tree, something very special. The first thing I noticed was its size. The tree is huge — it’s so huge that houses have been built inside the trunk. And then I noticed how different it looked — odd and beautiful at the same time…the branches are gnarly and look like roots that have been torn out of the ground. The Baobab Tree sits in the center of many villages in Afr

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Baobab harvesters under that Baobab Tree

When I saw my first Baobab tree in Zimbabwe, I stood in front of it in awe. The tree gave me a “feeling”…I had never even heard of the tree, but upon first glance I knew there was something different about this tree, something very special.

The first thing I noticed was its size. The tree is huge — it’s so huge that houses have been built inside the trunk. And then I noticed how different it looked — odd and beautiful at the same time…the branches are gnarly and look like roots that have been torn out of the ground.

The Baobab Tree sits in the center of many villages in Africa and is referred to as the “Tree of Life”. It holds deep spiritual significance to the communities that live around it. Stories of the baobab are as old as man, so it’s only fitting that the word baobab literally means “the time when man began”.

Rights of passage, spiritual ceremonies, village meetings, and shade seeking happen beneath these massive trees that are hundreds to thousands of years old, and they are so revered in their communities that many trees receive human names or become known as Um, which means mother. It is believed that the spirits of ancestors become a part of the trees and provide the nourishment that comes the water they store (a tree can store up to 30,000 gallons of water at once), their leaves, their seeds, and especially the dried pulp found in their fruit.

Child eating Baobab fruit

The fruit pulp is traditionally used medicinally to treat stomach aches, fevers, and malaria. Within the villages, it is also widely thought to cure hangovers and is used as a pain reliever for aches and pains, as well as arthritis. A UN study found that the pulp mixed with water was more effective in rehydrating children with severe diarrhea than World Health Organization remedies. It is also commonly used as a milk substitute.

Given the nutritional benefits, consumers around the world are purchasing the baobab powder, which is providing much needed income to the communities that live around Baobab trees. Harvestors sustainably harvest the fruit when it falls to the ground and the pulp is ground up to make a powder that can be added to smoothies, pancakes, and anything that would benefit from its tart and tangy taste.

Recent nutritional studies have given further insight into the fruit’s nutritional benefits which include:

More antioxidants than acai or Goji berries. It blows nearly every other superfood out of the water according to its ORAC score. Antioxidants protect our cells from damage caused by free radicals.

Nutrient-dense heavy-hitter. Baobab has potassium, Vitamin C, and is a source of Vitamin B6, magnesium, and calcium.

Immune boosting. Baobab fruit has an incredible amount of Vitamin C with 3-5 times the amount of an orange. One serving of Baobab powder (two tablespoons) has 25% of your daily recommended value of Vitamin C.

Prebiotic. A healthy gut is now recognized as being crucial to optimal health. You’ve heard of probiotics, but just as important are prebiotics which help that good bacteria grow in your gut. One serving of Baobab powder also has 24% of your daily recommended dietary fiber which aids in digestion.

Fiber-heavy. Baobab fruit is almost 50% fiber, half of which is soluble. Soluble fiber can help control blood glucose levels, improve blood cholesterol levels and heart health, help you feel fuller for longer, reduce visceral fat and slow down digestion. Soluble fiber could also help decrease the likelihood of insulin resistance.

Given these nutritional benefits, consumers around the world are purchasing the baobab powder, which is providing much needed income to the communities that live around Baobab trees. Harvestors sustainably harvest the fruit when it falls to the ground and the pulp is ground up to make a powder that can be added to smoothies, pancakes, and anything that would benefit from its tart and tangy taste.

Baobab fruit opened

Harvesters, who are mostly women, are using the income to pay for school fees, to buy wells, and to generally improve their quality of life.

And now that the trees also have an economic value in addition to the spiritual and nutritional value in the communities, they are being protected to an even greater extent, meaning that man (and woman) can give back to the tree that’s given so much to them.

I created Bumbleroot to get more Baobab out in the world and to provide more economic opportunities for the women (and men) who harvest the baobab. We’re committed to dreaming up and creating unique and healthy products using baobab and other wild harvested foods from around the world. Check out our baobab powder and other products at www.bumblerootfoods.com

~Sara


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Baobab energy bites

Baobab Energy Snack Bites Holiday travels, shopping trips, parties. It's a lot and it's A LOT... Keep these tasty bit-sized bundles of goodness close by to ward off the "Hangry" as you move through this holiday season.     Ingredients: - 4 dates - 1/2 cup raw cashews - a pinch of sea salt - 1 tablespoon cacao nibs - 2 tablespoons of Bumbleroot organic Baobab powder - 2 tablespoons of flax seeds - 1 teaspoon vanilla extract Preparation: - Soak dates for 30 minutes. - Grind cashews in a food processor. - Add dates and other ingredients to food proces

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Baobab Energy Snack Bites

Holiday travels, shopping trips, parties. It’s a lot and it’s A LOT…

Keep these tasty bit-sized bundles of goodness close by to ward off the “Hangry” as you move through this holiday season.

 

 

Ingredients:

– 4 dates

– 1/2 cup raw cashews

– a pinch of sea salt

– 1 tablespoon cacao nibs

– 2 tablespoons of Bumbleroot organic Baobab powder

– 2 tablespoons of flax seeds

– 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Preparation:

– Soak dates for 30 minutes.

– Grind cashews in a food processor.

– Add dates and other ingredients to food processor and pulse.

– Make small balls.

Find your Baobab powder HERE.

 


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Baobab Citrus Vitamin C-packed Smoothie

Fighting off a cold weather cold? We love this easy-peasy Vitamin C-packed smoothie when we're battling the sniffles. Just one serving of Baobab contains 25% of your daily recommended value of Vitamin C.  We like to amplify the Baobab with a medley of citrus in this nourishing smoothie. Ingredients: - 1 1/2 to 2 cups of water (and some ice) -  2 oranges or 3-4 mandarins - 1/2 pears - 3 tablespoons of Baobab powder -  Juice of 1/2 lemon Blend well and enjoy! Find your Baobab powder HERE.  

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Fighting off a cold weather cold? We love this easy-peasy Vitamin C-packed smoothie when we’re battling the sniffles.

Just one serving of Baobab contains 25% of your daily recommended value of Vitamin C.  We like to amplify the Baobab with a medley of citrus in this nourishing smoothie.

Ingredients:

– 1 1/2 to 2 cups of water (and some ice)

–  2 oranges or 3-4 mandarins

– 1/2 pears

– 3 tablespoons of Baobab powder

–  Juice of 1/2 lemon

Blend well and enjoy!

Find your Baobab powder HERE.

 


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Rose Petal Honey

We love foods wild foods, and one of our very favorite wild foods is honey. Our friend, Becca, The Dabblist, shows us how we can enhance this sweet treat with roses. This is such a cozy activity for a Fall afternoon. Enjoy! From Becca: I like to add rose petals into my food and body care as much as possible. In addition to wooing you with their intoxicating scent, rose petals help to soothe and cleanse the skin and are known to support your internal digestion and liver with a boost of vitamin C and other vital nutrients. And then, there’s honey – a beautiful, delici

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Rose Petal Honey

We love foods wild foods, and one of our very favorite wild foods is honey. Our friend, Becca, The Dabblist, shows us how we can enhance this sweet treat with roses. This is such a cozy activity for a Fall afternoon. Enjoy!

From Becca:

I like to add rose petals into my food and body care as much as possible. In addition to wooing you with their intoxicating scent, rose petals help to soothe and cleanse the skin and are known to support your internal digestion and liver with a boost of vitamin C and other vital nutrients.

And then, there’s honey – a beautiful, deliciously sweet gift from our beloved bees. Raw honey contains powerful healing enzymes, enhances absorption of nutrients in the body, and is super antioxidant.

This simple combination of rose petals and honey will add beauty and delight to your home. I like to add my rose honey to tea, drizzle over roast vegetables, and add it to salad dressing recipes.

A note about the quality of both your roses and your honey:

While they are both readily available at your local grocery store, it is super important (both for your body and the future of their species) to grab the purest version you can.

For roses, this means unsprayed (from the garden or a trusted source) and for honey, this means raw (unpasteurized) and local, if possible.

Rose Petal Honey

*1 glass jar of desired size (make sure it’s clean!)
*2 tbsp dried or fresh rose petals
*Enough raw, local honey to fill your jar

Add rose petals to the jar, then pour the honey over the roses filling to the top. Using a wood spoon or a chopstick, stir to mix them together, and seal tight. Let sit for 2-4 weeks {to allow ingredients to infuse}, then it’s ready for use.

***

Becca Piastrelli is the woman behind The Dabblist, and she believes in the practice of working with your hands.  Because, when we honor that primal desire to take raw ingredients and turn them into something beautiful, we experience a greater connection and engagement with ourselves and the world around us. You can often find her in her kitchen, crafting her own beauty and skincare products – everything from deodorant to lip balm.

 


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The Global Table – Barbacoa: Ancient Alchemy of Feast and Fire

  Welcome to our latest installment of: The Global Table, where we share stories of what and how we eat around the world. Check back here every few weeks for a new dish, a new story, and a new perspective on the world. If you were to walk into a noisy tianguis (city center marketplace) in Mexico on a Sunday afternoon, you would be privy to the sight and sounds of revelers singing and dancing to cumbia and mariachi music, tequila and beers flowing from cups, gaggles of families and friends c

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Stocksy_txp3ef8750633e000_Small_669070Welcome to our latest installment of: The Global Table, where we share stories of what and how we eat around the world. Check back here every few weeks for a new dish, a new story, and a new perspective on the world.

If you were to walk into a noisy tianguis (city center marketplace) in Mexico on a Sunday afternoon, you would be privy to the sight and sounds of revelers singing and dancing to cumbia and mariachi music, tequila and beers flowing from cups, gaggles of families and friends congregated together eating tortillas slathered with avocado, salsa, and the unmistakeable aroma of freshly cooked barbacoa meat. What is behind this ancient Native ceremony of eating barbacoa that is at the centerpiece of so many weddings, celebrations, and community fiestas.


The global history of barbacoa has many different interpretations and is as hotly debated as what region of Mexico makes the best barbacoa. The major consensus is that the word barbacoa comes from the ancient Taino Caribbean tribe, and refers to the large wooden frame they would use to roast seafood, and poultry over burning embers. However, some research suggests that the word is actually Mayan in origin which means “meat covered over dirt” and refers to the widely known technique used in Mexico. This would imply that the real origin of barbacoa is native to ancient Mexico and was transported to the Taino in Haiti where they omitted digging the pit, and instead roasted game over a wooden frame. Historical mysteries aside, the Spanish were deeply impressed by the tasty tender meat and influenced the evolution of barbacoa by introducing sheep, cattle, pigs, and goats into the fire.

In Mexico, barbacoa refers not only to the method of cooking game but also to the meat itself. The method involves digging a deep pit into the ground, filling it with volcanic rocks and mesquite logs, then wrapping the meat in maguey leaves, covering the pit with dirt, and cooking it overnight to wake up to the aromas of ancient heaven. There is a Oaxacan tradition that involves leaving a bottle of mezcal inside the pit near the animal, tying a wire to the bottle attached to a cross (marking it as a grave) and when the barbacoa is ready, drinking the bottle of mezcal and toasting with guests to the ensuing celebration. As an avid partaker of many barbacoas, the festivities usually begin on the night that the meat is prepared and covered over so that when the hangover arrives at dawn, the barbacoa acts as a welcome morning medicine.

Barbacoa pits vary in size, but are usually at least 2 feet in diameter and 3 feet deep, large enough to roast a whole pig. Stones are lodged into the pit with logs on top; they are burned for a few hours until the heat is at the right temperature, at which point many of the stones are rearranged. The maguey leaves will then be used to cover all the coals, then a large pot of barbacoa consomme ingredients (carrots, onions, garbanzo beans, potatoes) with water is placed on top of the coals to provide the steam, with a wire frame placed on top. The meat is lodged atop the frame and is not cooked by the fire, but by the vapor and steam emitted from the moisture which is essential to give the meat the famed smokey tenderness and taste.

Mexican barbacoa has a dizzying amount of variety which changes based on the region and native tribes that inhabited the area. Hildalgo is famous for its sheep barbacoa, and is consistently rated high by barbacoa aficionados, Yucatan for pig, aka known famously as “cochinita pibil” which marinates the pork in citrus juice and uses achiote seeds and banana leaves instead of maguey. Jalisco uses goat or lamb well known as “birria”, a stewy version that uses guajillo chiles, and is a hit with those of us who prefer a spicy juicy broth to accompany our meat. In Veracruz, there is Zacahuil the tamale version of barbacoa, where they cook massive versions of a tamale in the barbacoa pit which can be up to 5 meters long! There is also the Oaxacan version which uses “borrego” (lamb) which also has its fair share of hype largely attributed to Rick Bayless endorsement. A common denominator that abounds in all these styles of barbacoa is that they are all served with homemade tortillas, refried beans, spicy salsa or guacamole, to add a final dash of flavor. A group of friends, family, a celebratory mood and a bottle of mezcal, and you are as close to the real thing whether in Hidalgo, Oaxaca, New York, the Bay Area or beyond.

Making Barbacoa at Home

Now, to make barbacoa at home we aren’t asking you to go out and dig a large pit in your backyard, (unless you want to) so we invite you to try this slow-cooker home-version from Rick Bayless.

 

Slow Cooker Lamb Barbacoa

 

 

 


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Five new ways to drink Bumbleroot

"Put a lime in the coconut [water] and and drink them both up.." is just one of the ways Bumbleroot customers have been putting a twist on the tried and tested, "just add water" way of consuming our drink mixes. We've compiled five of our favorite ways that Bumbleroot customers are drinking their Bumbleroot (and a few we've tried and loved): 1) Add lemon (or lime) - a little acid can bring out a lot of flavor and the health benefits of lime and lemon are great - while they are "acidic" outside of the body - in the body they are "alkaline" and can help balance our PH levels and counter the acidity we get from processed foods and meat.

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“Put a lime in the coconut [water] and and drink them both up..” is just one of the ways Bumbleroot customers have been putting a twist on the tried and tested, “just add water” way of consuming our drink mixes.

We’ve compiled five of our favorite ways that Bumbleroot customers are drinking their Bumbleroot (and a few we’ve tried and loved):

1) Add lemon (or lime) – a little acid can bring out a lot of flavor and the health benefits of lime and lemon are great – while they are “acidic” outside of the body – in the body they are “alkaline” and can help balance our PH levels and counter the acidity we get from processed foods and meat.

2) Create a blender-less smoothie – there are so many things that you can add to your drink mix without using a blender – try bee pollen (one of our favorites – with the Blueberry flavor), cacao nibs, chia seeds, etc for a little extra something, something in your drink.

3) Try it hot – as in, boil up some water hot. Make the drinks into a tea – especially good with the blueberry and lemongrass flavors.

4) Just add a banana (and ice) and put it in the blender – great with all of the flavors – an instant, easy smoothie – kids especially like this one!

5) Make a cocktail by adding some vodka or rum – tested by a few Bumbleroot customers. Works especially well with the Pineapple Mint flavor.


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5 Ways Not to Skip a Workout

There is something about moving our bodies that brings us back to ourselves. And at the same time that movement helps us expand our view of ourselves and of the world. Most of us know how important it is to get out there and move, but sometimes it can be difficult to make that first step.  On the Bumbleroot blog, our friend, Stephanie Burg, a former professional ballet dancer, shares her tips for making exercise a more consistent part of our lives. - Sara Afte

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There is something about moving our bodies that brings us back to ourselves. And at the same time that movement helps us expand our view of ourselves and of the world. Most of us know how important it is to get out there and move, but sometimes it can be difficult to make that first step. 

On the Bumbleroot blog, our friend, Stephanie Burg, a former professional ballet dancer, shares her tips for making exercise a more consistent part of our lives.

– Sara

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After years of maintaining a rigid, intense physical activity routine in my career as a professional ballerina–hello, 700 ab exercises + 8-10 hours of dancing daily–I know a thing or two about body movement.  Granted, while I was dancing, I tended to get a little extreme with how hard I pushed myself, but my career was my passion, my driving force in life.  

Now, as a Board Certified Nutrition and Lifestyle Coach, I often hear my clients say that incorporating exercise into their daily schedules is one of the most difficult areas on their wellness journey.  Not only does it seem like there aren’t enough hours in the day to accomplish all they desire, but many of my clients note that, truth be told, they don’t always enjoy exercise very much because it feels like just another thing ‘to-do’.

As human beings our bodies are designed to move, yet we don’t have activity built into our days the way we used to.   We no longer have to hunt and gather for our food and we have amazing technology to make our lives easier.  But a lack of movement is scientifically linked to higher rates of depression, anxiety and lower self-confidence, not to mention weight gain and disease.  Rationally, it makes perfect sense for us to move each day, but somehow that’s not enough.  Some of us still have trouble making it happen with all we are responsible for in a given day.  

Daily movement is important not just so you look great in your skinny jeans–although that’s great– but to help you show up more fully in your life.

If you’re finding it difficult to prioritize daily movement, a simple task to try is to not worry about how you can squeeze movement into your day (i.e. as just another item to check off your to-do list), but how to make the movement you choose, the most enjoyable experience you possibly can, so you look forward to it and are more likely to make it happen consistently.

Here are five things that help me and my clients stay motivated to get moving:

1. A great playlist. Music helps to positively distract you from your efforts (read: pain and exertion), while a good beat can help you to push harder based on the tempo you choose.  Most importantly, movement helps to elevate your mood.  

2. Nature.  Connecting to fresh air and the world around us is so much more enjoyable than slogging away indoors.  Oxygen works wonders for metabolism and time seems to go by much quicker when we aren’t staring at a timer on the treadmill.

3. Switching it up.  By choosing activities that require all of your senses, you help to keep yourself engaged in the process.  Try to find different types of movement to do throughout the week to avoid boredom and moving on autopilot.

4. Make it FUN.  Enough said.  Make sure you actually enjoy it!  This is so important.  If you’re time is limited as it is, or you’re resistant to moving regularly, you’ve got to find something that is pleasurable for you and suits your unique body. Period.

5. Reward yourself afterward.  Give yourself something to look forward to by scheduling a fun, restorative or nourishing activity afterward. This allows you to celebrate your efforts and can help you stay consistent if built into part of your movement routine.

The more physically active we are, the sharper our minds, better our digestion, and more fluid our posture. These five tools are easy ways to stay inspired by your body, utilizing movement as the key. When used regularly, I’ve seen these steps transform people who “hate exercise” into body movement enthusiasts, practicing regularly.  

I’d love to hear from you.  What are your favorite ways to stay active? Drop me a line at stephanie@stephanieburgcoaching.com.

Have an amazing week filled with empowered choices and vibrant energy.  Here’s to supporting your amazing body-home, one workout at a time.

I invite you to love the body you call home,
Stephanie

P.s.  What works for one person, might not work for another.  This applies to the food we eat, the clothes we wear, the music we love, the scents that appeal to us, the people we’re attracted to, and so on.  Part of our journey in this lifetime is uncovering what actually works for us and no one else. If you’d like a few tools to help you figure out what type of movement works best for your unique body, click HERE for some easy ways to figure it out.

BIO:

Stephanie Burg was a professional ballerina for over a decade.  After years of restrictive, disordered eating and utter disregard for her body, a series of injuries took her from the stage and forced her to reevaluate every facet of her life, starting with her relationship to her body.

Now a Board Certified Nutrition & Lifestyle Coach, Stephanie is a fierce advocate for the human form, teaching women to return to the innate wisdom and brilliance of their female bodies by shedding outmoded, limiting beliefs and prioritizing excellent nutrition and self-care. Stephanie believes that when a woman loves the body she calls home, she embraces her power to create the life she was born to live

Stephanie’s work has been featured in publications such as ABC News, Colorado Public Radio, Dance Magazine, Mind Body Green, Elephant Journal, Tiny Buddha, and various national and local publications.  Stephanie was selected as one of Charleston, SC’s “50 Most Progressive” celebrating the most forward-thinking individuals having an impact on the future of Charleston.


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The Global Table – Sadza

We’re excited to introduce our new blog The Global Table, sharing stories of what and how we eat around the world. Check back here every two weeks for a new dish, a new story, and a new perspective on the world. In many village homes in Zimbabwe and neighboring countries, sadza and the night’s side dish of beans, greens, or chicken stew (if it’s a really special day!) sit over a fire in front of the house in two communal bowls. The village women spend much of the day working to prepare sadza with just the right texture, best described

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We’re excited to introduce our new blog The Global Table, sharing stories of what and how we eat around the world. Check back here every two weeks for a new dish, a new story, and a new perspective on the world.

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In many village homes in Zimbabwe and neighboring countries, sadza and the night’s side dish of beans, greens, or chicken stew (if it’s a really special day!) sit over a fire in front of the house in two communal bowls. The village women spend much of the day working to prepare sadza with just the right texture, best described as a thick porridge bordering on dough. Balance is critical: the sadza can’t be too mushy or too thick. When it’s ready, the family and others gather around the fire to scoop some of the sadza between their fingers, using it to grab bites of the other tasty dishes. It’s truly finger food!

Making sadza is a long and labor intensive artform. Beginning with corn still on the cob, the kernels must be removed and ground into cornmeal. In the modern day, much of this work is done in mills, either directly for farmers who grow their own crop or for sale in retail outlets. This flour-like substance is mixed with cold water to form the sadza’s base, which is then added to boiling water and mixed with more cornmeal to achieve the desired consistency, all the while being stirred and kneaded to rid the mix of lumps, a process that demands attention, time, and lots of practice!

Sadza is served with any number of other foods, from red meat and game to native spring greens and cabbage. A thinner version of sadza is eaten for breakfast, often paired with peanut butter to provide a protein complement to the important carbohydrates inherent in the sadza itself.

In addition to being one of the most important meals on the African continent, sadza provides a miniature history lesson about the region. Today most sadza is cornmeal based, although it can also be made with native cereal grains like finger millet or sorghum, as it was for centuries before European settlers arrived. Corn, or maize as it is known in Africa, is actually not native to the continent; it wasn’t even widely grown in Africa until the late 1800s when British colonials began migrating to the area and brought corn with them. The dish represents the blending of influences on the continent. Today, corn is a staple in Africa, especially favored for its ability to grow during drier periods.

For as large a swath of land as it covers, sadza is known by an equally large collection of names: originally derived from the Shona language (native to Zimbabwe), sadza is also know by “isitshwala” in Southern Ndebele (spoken in the Transvaal region), “pap,” “vuswa,” or “bogobe” in South Africa, “nsima” in Malawi, and “ugali” in Eastern Africa. Wherever you go in Southern and Eastern Africa, some version of sadza is sure to be cooking over the fire!

If you’d like to try to make sadza at home, try this recipe that uses Sorghum from the website Pepper and Stew:

Here is what you will need to make this dish:

About 400g ground sorghum

1.5l water

2 tbsp oil

1 large chopped onion

2 ripe chopped tomatoes

3 tbsp peanut butter

250g Spinach

Salt and pepper


Sadza

First take 150g of the sorghum meal and in a medium sized sauce pan, mix with about 150ml of the cold water to make a paste using a wooden spoon.

Add a litre of the boiling water to the paste. Put on the hob on medium heat and stir continuously until the mixture starts to thicken. If it’s too thick add a bit more of the hot water.

The mixture should look like porridge and if it’s the correct consistency should boil without spilling over. (If it’s still watery and spilling over then add a little more sorghum in a cup, about a 1/4 cup, add cold water to create a paste then stir this mixture to the pot, the mixture should start to thicken after stirring continuously)

Cover and leave to cook for about 15 minutes.

After 15 minutes lower the heat and leave covered for another 5 minutes.

Stir in the remaining sorghum flour  gradually taking great care not to get burnt by the spatter.

Keep mixing briskly and to get rid of the lumps grind the mixture against the pot with the wooden spoon, the consistency of the sadza should be the same as mashed potatoes.

Leave on very low heat for another 15 minutes to cook through.


Peanut butter spinach

Heat oil in a pan and add the onions and fry until soft.

Add the chopped tomatoes , season with salt and pepper and cook until soft.

Now add the peanut butter and a little water and stir until the penut butter is mixed in.

Add the spinach and cook for another 10 minutes.

Check for seasoning and serve with hot sadza.

(To give this dish a twist you can add a little birds eye chilli and or bell peppers)

Enjoy!

 


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Bumbleroot as a verb

to Bumbleroot (v): to go outside and explore with no goal in mind; to engage in an activity with only the intention of fun and play Last week, I was visiting one of Bumbleroot’s chefs, Matt, in Singapore. Matt is a phenomenal triathlete/Ironman and is on a cycling team that includes pro cyclists. The team hydrates with Bumbleroot and he told me that somehow they had taken to using Bumbleroot as a verb that described when someone would go out to ride just for fun, or the love of it. As in “I went Bumblerooting this afternoon…took the bike out just for fun and explored some new routes.” I LOVE that this the Bumbleroot name is bein

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to Bumbleroot (v): to go outside and explore with no goal in mind; to engage in an activity with only the intention of fun and play

Last week, I was visiting one of Bumbleroot’s chefs, Matt, in Singapore. Matt is a phenomenal triathlete/Ironman and is on a cycling team that includes pro cyclists. The team hydrates with Bumbleroot and he told me that somehow they had taken to using Bumbleroot as a verb that described when someone would go out to ride just for fun, or the love of it. As in “I went Bumblerooting this afternoon…took the bike out just for fun and explored some new routes.”

I LOVE that this the Bumbleroot name is being used in this way.

I realized earlier this year that I needed more “Bumblerooting” in my life. I was working way too much and was losing sight of why I was working in the first place. I wasn’t having much fun and I’m sure I wasn’t very fun to be around.

I decided to incorporate a day of play each week. It took me a month to actually do this…I kept putting it off. But then I did it…I woke up early on a Sunday morning and left San Francisco, driving north. I wasn’t sure where I was going.

I ended up at the Point Reyes national seashore. And found a gorgeous beach that I had all to myself (except for a drone flying overhead). I later (through Facebook – it’s such a small world!) saw this photo that the drone took that day and love having it as a reminder of the day I spent exploring somewhere new.

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Photo credit: Adam Mosseri

After spending time at the beach, I went into the cute town of Point Reyes and spent an hour in a bookstore and enjoyed a long lunch outside.

To be honest, the day wasn’t always comfortable…it had been so long since I had “played” or explored that I wasn’t sure how to do it. But I stuck to it and did another day of play the next week. And the next week, it expanded to a weekend of play…I’m starting to get used to play, really used to it. And the more “Bumblerooting” I do…the more work I’m getting done (without it feeling like work), the more creative I feel, and magical things keep happening.

I’m becoming a passionate advocate for “Bumblerooting”!

We’d love to hear how you go Bumblerooting. Hashtag your #bumblerooting adventures Instagram and we’ll pick our favorites to repost. Once a month, we’ll pick one of our #bumblerooting adventurers to receive a free box of Bumbleroot.

Wishing you lots of Bumblerooting!

Sara

 

 

 


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The Baobab Tree: Legend, lore, and medicinal benefits

The baobab tree is a huge, gnarly tree that looks like it’s been ripped out of the ground and turned upside down. Grown throughout Africa, the tree is treasured in its communities – as a place of shade, as a spiritual meeting place, and for the many uses of its fruit, seeds, leaves, and bark. Some baobab trees are over 6000 years old, making them some of the oldest living plants in the world. The baobab tree holds a special place in African legends and folklore. In one story (told in many variations), the baobab was jealous of more beautiful trees, and God turned the tree upside down because of the tree’s lack of gratitu

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The baobab tree is a huge, gnarly tree that looks like it’s been ripped out of the ground and turned upside down. Grown throughout Africa, the tree is treasured in its communities – as a place of shade, as a spiritual meeting place, and for the many uses of its fruit, seeds, leaves, and bark. Some baobab trees are over 6000 years old, making them some of the oldest living plants in the world.

The baobab tree holds a special place in African legends and folklore. In one story (told in many variations), the baobab was jealous of more beautiful trees, and God turned the tree upside down because of the tree’s lack of gratitude. In another legend, the hyena was given the tree as a gift, and ended up planting it upside down.

The tree’s treasured status is also due in large part to its many nutritional benefits. In traditional medicine, the baobab fruit pulp has been used for thousands of years to reduce fevers, to treat pain, to fight infection, as an anti-inflammatory, and to treat diarrhea and dysentery. It has also been used, historically, to treat measles and smallpox. Recent studies provide more evidence to support the fruit’s place as the “king of the superfoods”.

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Some of the most powerful attributes of the fruit found in studies, include:

– Antioxidants (more antioxidants of acai or goji berries)

– Anti-inflammatory properties

– Fever reducing effects

– Analgesic properties (pain relief)

– Anti-microbial properties

– Anti-viral activity

– Hepaprotective properties (protection from liver damage)

– Anti-diarrhea activity

In addition, the baobab pulp is a source of vitamin C (25% DV in one serving), dietary fiber, magnesium, and potassium.

Want to try out the this fruit from the “tree of life?” Try out our 100% Organic Baobab Fruit Pulp, with free shipping (for a limited time). Find recipes for smoothies and more at http://bumblerootfoods.com/category/recipes/.

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Source of attribute information:

“A review of baobab (Adansonia digita) products: Effect of processing techniques, medicinal properties & uses”, Kabore.


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The African Philosophy that has the Power to Change Lives

In Southern Africa, there is a beautiful concept called Ubuntu…. It has been translated as “I am, because you are,” “I am; because of you,” or “I am what I am because of who we all are.” Ubuntu represents the interconnectedness of humans and the communities in which we live and thrive.  We are who we are because of other people.  Embracing Ubuntu means we acknowledge being part of a greater whole. At Bumbleroot, this concept is at the core of our mission. Our ingredients are expertly sourced by harvesters and farmers around the world who a

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In Southern Africa, there is a beautiful concept called Ubuntu….

It has been translated as “I am, because you are,” “I am; because of you,” or “I am what I am because of who we all are.”

Ubuntu represents the interconnectedness of humans and the communities in which we live and thrive.  We are who we are because of other people.  Embracing Ubuntu means we acknowledge being part of a greater whole.

At Bumbleroot, this concept is at the core of our mission.

Our ingredients are expertly sourced by harvesters and farmers around the world who are committed to sustainable practices that will leave the world a better place for all of us

We are committed to paying these harvesters and farmers a fair wage so that they can support their families and contribute to their communities

We reinvest a portion of our revenues into our supplying communities to strengthen their communities and our supply chain, and

Our products are nutritious and made from real, pronounceable ingredients – helping you live your best life so that you can help others live their best lives.

What does Ubuntu mean to you?

To learn more:

Watch this TEDTalk by South African Safari guide Boyd Varty to learn more about Ubuntu and his memories of Nelson Mandela who embodied the concept and gave us the power to recognize and understand that each of us is responsible for the well being of ourselves and of others.

http://new.ted.com/talks/boyd_varty_what_i_learned_from_nelson_mandela

About Bumbleroot:

Bumbleroot creates healthy and delicious beverages and snacks that include unique, sustainably-sourced superfood ingredients from around the world.  Our first product is a Coconut Water and Baobab Drink Mix that provides everyday hydration, antioxidants, and nutrients in a convenient pocket-sized pouch.  Learn more about us at: bumblerootfoods.com

Baobab is an African superfruit with more antioxidants than acai or goji berries.  It’s also a source of Vitamin C, magnesium, and potassium and is one of the most alkaline foods available.


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Baobab Banana Cacao Smoothie Recipe

  One of my favorite ways to use Baobab powder is in this smoothie.  I eat it for breakfast a few times a week and love to have it after workouts too.  Either way, it gives me an energy boost and it tastes like dessert. Baobab is one the most alkaline foods available (PRAL rating of -52), and is high in antioxidants, vitamin, C, and dietary fiber.  It also is a source of magnesium, potassium, and loads of other great things. - 1 cup of almond milk - 1 banana - 1 tablespoon of Baobab powder - 1 tablespoon of peanut butter or almond butter (I love Justin's Honey Pea

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Baobab Banana Cacao Smoothie Recipe

 

One of my favorite ways to use Baobab powder is in this smoothie.  I eat it for breakfast a few times a week and love to have it after workouts too.  Either way, it gives me an energy boost and it tastes like dessert.

Baobab is one the most alkaline foods available (PRAL rating of -52), and is high in antioxidants, vitamin, C, and dietary fiber.  It also is a source of magnesium, potassium, and loads of other great things.

– 1 cup of almond milk

– 1 banana

– 1 tablespoon of Baobab powder

– 1 tablespoon of peanut butter or almond butter (I love Justin’s Honey Peanut Butter)

– 1/2 teaspoon cacao powder

Blend in blender and sprinkle with a few cacao nibs.  Enjoy!

You can get baobab powder in our online shop.

– Sara


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10 things you didn’t know about the Baobab fruit

  1. The Baobab fruit has more antioxidants that acai or goji berries.  It blows nearly every other superfood out of the water according to its ORAC score.  This heavy hitter also has potassium, magnesium, calcium, and Vitamin C.
  2. How to pronounce Baobab. There is no agreed to pronunciation. Even in Africa where it's grown, people pronounce it differently.  The most common pronunciations are: Bow-bob, Bow-bab, Bay-o-bob, and Bay-o-bab.  Try them out and pick your favorite.
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10 things to know about baobab

  1. The Baobab fruit has more antioxidants that acai or goji berries.  It blows nearly every other superfood out of the water according to its ORAC score.  This heavy hitter also has potassium, magnesium, calcium, and Vitamin C.
  2. How to pronounce Baobab. There is no agreed to pronunciation. Even in Africa where it’s grown, people pronounce it differently.  The most common pronunciations are: Bow-bob, Bow-bab, Bay-o-bob, and Bay-o-bab.  Try them out and pick your favorite.
  3. It’s super alkaline. For our bodies to function optimally, we should make sure that we have an alkaline PH blood level.  How do we do this? By eating highly alkaline foods.  Baobab is one of the highest alkaline foods available with a a PRAL rating of -52.
  4. It’s an amazing source of dietary fiber and vitamin C.  One serving (~two tablespoons) has 25% of your daily recommended value of Vitamin C and 24% of your daily recommended dietary fiber.
  5. And…it acts as a prebiotic.  That is not a typo.  You’ve heard of probiotics, but just as important are prebiotics which help that good bacteria grow in your gut.  The fiber in the baobab fruit has prebiotic properties.
  6. The Baobab tree is one one of the most gnarly trees you have ever seen.  Also known as the “tree of life”, it looks like it’s been torn out of the ground and turned upside down.  And some of the trees are so big that they have been carved out and have bars inside of them.
  7. The tree is grown in the poorest areas of Africa.  Baobab trees grow in the driest areas in Africa, which are usually also the poorest areas.  Income opportunities are scarce and harvesting Baobab can provide the people who live in these areas the funds to improve their quality of life.
  8. It’s harvested sustainably.  When the fruit is ripe, it falls to the ground and is picked up by harvesters.  No damage is done to the tree.  In fact, certain practices that harm the tree (like shaving the bark to create rugs) are prohibited in the areas that harvest Baobab fruit for income.  So harvesting the fruit actually helps save the trees.
  9. Cyclists and other athletes love it. Whether it’s the antioxidants or the other vitamins and minerals, athletes adding Baobab to their diets are enjoying increased energy and lessened recovery times.  Ironman Matt White says.  “I used baobab in all my smoothies in training leading up to the Ironman race.  It provided sustained energy throughout the day, even after intense workout sessions.”
  10. How to eat it. The fruit comes in raw, powdered form.  It’s ready to add to smoothies, salad dressings, on oatmeal, to anything chocolate and more.  Its sweet and tangy taste pairs amazingly with honey..

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Eat Well and Do Good – An African superfood gift pack featuring Baobab and Moringa from Bumbleroot and Kuli Kuli.

To help someone in need, what do you do? Often, we think we must give oodles of money or time to help those in need. But where does that money go? How can you afford that time? Concerns like these can make issues of poverty and malnutrition seem insurmountable, and so often we end up doing nothing at all… Here’s a solution. Don’t sweat saving the world in one fell swoop. Instead, contribute to a bigger cause by buying products that responsibly lift up those in need. Con

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To help someone in need, what do you do?

Often, we think we must give oodles of money or time to help those in need. But where does that money go? How can you afford that time? Concerns like these can make issues of poverty and malnutrition seem insurmountable, and so often we end up doing nothing at all…

Here’s a solution.

Don’t sweat saving the world in one fell swoop. Instead, contribute to a bigger cause by buying products that responsibly lift up those in need. Conscientious health food companies Bumbleroot and Kuli Kuli have teamed up to let you do just that. This holiday season, take advantage of our nutrient-packed gift pack featuring Bumbleboot Baobab Drink Mixes and Kuli Kuli Superfood Bars with Moringa. These superfood products will help your body, while our companies’ business models help those in need.

Purchases increase incomes in Africa.

Nutrient-packed superfoods Baobab and Moringa are purchased from low-income communities in Africa committed to sustainable farming and harvesting practices. Your purchase helps increase their income and also encourages these men and women to incorporate these superfoods into their own diets, helping to combat the malnutrition that is rife in their communities. Learn more here.

Helping those in need has never been so easy. Or healthy.

The Eat Well and Do Good gift pack is available for a limited time this holiday season. Click here to help those in need by getting your healthy drinks and snacks.

Baobab

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The baobab fruit comes from the Baobab tree – a gnarly tree that looks like it’s been torn out of the ground and turned upside down. Also known as the “tree of life”, it’s often grown in the most drought prone and poorest areas in Africa.

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The fruit pulp is in powder-form when the fruit is opened.  The pulp contains 10x more antioxidants than acai or goji berry and is a source of vitamin C, dietary fiber, potassium, and magnesium.

Moringa

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The tiny leaves of the Moringa oleifera tree may be the world’s most nutritious green with high levels of protein, calcium, iron, Vitamin C and Vitamin A. Once eaten by the ancient Romans, Greeks and Egyptians, moringa leaves have been used in traditional medicine passed down for centuries in many cultures. More recently, the modern scientific community has begun to validate many of these claims with over 1300 studies, articles and publications on moringa. Kuli Kuli is the first company to retail ready-to-eat moringa products.

Bumbleroot

Bumbleroot creates tasty, healthy beverage food products from unique, organic, sustainably-sourced ingredients.  Bumbleroot creates markets for these ingredients – getting them into the hands of health-conscious consumers – while providing income to low-income communities throughout the world and encouraging sustainable agriculture

Bumbleroot’s first product line is a single serving powdered drink mix featuring organic fair trade coconut water, organic baobab, and real fruit and herb powders for flavoring. The superfood-filled drink mix delights the taste buds and is easy to take on the go for all sorts of play – traveling, cycling, hiking, yoga, etc.

Bumbleroot was born when founder Sara Andrews came across the baobab fruit while living and volunteering in Zimbabwe with the NGO TechnoServe.  Baobab is grown in drought-prone areas that often have few income opportunities.  Creating a market for baobab creates income opportunities for the people who live in the areas where the baobab tree grows.

Kuli Kuli

Kuli Kuli is the first company to introduce moringa, a unique superfood, to the U.S. market in the form of a food product. Our first moringa product is a gluten-free nutrition bar full of simple, wholesome ingredients and a nutritious burst of moringa. We form women-owned farming cooperatives in West Africa to grow moringa and use it to improve the health of their communities. By incentivizing women to use moringa and paying fair trade wages, Kuli Kuli is improving livelihoods and health.

“As a Peace Corps Volunteer in Niger, I saw first-hand the impact that moringa can have on improving nutrition. I came up with the idea to support women’s cooperatives to grow more moringa to nourish their communities and earn a livelihood by selling a portion of their harvests in the United States in the form of delicious Kuli Kuli Bars,” said Lisa Curtis, Kuli Kuli’s Founder and CEO.

Kuli Kuli Bars are gluten-free, vegan and made with just a few simple all-natural ingredients. They are low in calories but contain high amounts of fiber, protein and vitamins. Kuli Kuli has tested their bars at farmer’s markets in Oakland to resounding success.

Follow Bumbleroot and Sara Andrews on Twitter: @bumblerootfoods @sara_g_andrews

Follow Kuli Kuli and Lisa Curtis on Twitter: @kulikulibar @lisacurtis

Follow Bumbleroot on Facebook

Follow Kuli Kuli on Facebook

www.bumblerootfoods.com

www.kulikulibar.com



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Recipe – Baobab Cacao Mousse

Baobab – the African superfruit – is super alkaline,  packed with antioxidants, is a source of Vitamin C and dietary fiber, and acts as a prebiotic.  The tangy sweet powder that comes from the fruit pairs great with desserts, and chocolate specifically.  This dairy-free, raw, superfood-filled mousse is creamy and rich with a hint of citrus.  Best of all it takes only a few minutes to make. Perfect for holiday parties or parties of two. 2 avocados 3 tablespoons of cacao powder 2 tablespoons of honey (you can also substitute agave syrup or dates)

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Baobab – the African superfruit – is super alkaline,  packed with antioxidants, is a source of Vitamin C and dietary fiber, and acts as a prebiotic.  The tangy sweet powder that comes from the fruit pairs great with desserts, and chocolate specifically.  This dairy-free, raw, superfood-filled mousse is creamy and rich with a hint of citrus.  Best of all it takes only a few minutes to make.

Perfect for holiday parties or parties of two.

2 avocados

3 tablespoons of cacao powder

2 tablespoons of honey (you can also substitute agave syrup or dates)

1 teaspoon of baobab pulp

Sprinkling of coconut chips (optional)

A little crystallized ginger (optional)

You can dress up the mousse with some coconut chips and crystallized ginger.

Combine all the ingredients and blend in blender or food processor.
Serves 2

You can get organic baobab pulp here.

 

 

 

 


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Announcement: Weighing in at 12 grams, Bumbleroot’s Baobab Drink Mixes are here! 10% off online orders

I’m sitting writing this and drinking Bumbleroot’s Baobab Drink Mix (it’s the Lemongrass right now...I’m trying to decide if it’s my favorite flavor…it’s in a neck to neck tie with Pineapple Vanilla at this point). Two and a half years ago, I was sitting at Starbucks in Boulder with the charming Chef Barr Hogan, asking how we could create a drink using Baobab, a nutrient-packed fruit I’d found while volunteering in Zimbabwe.  I wanted to create a drink that would get the superfruit to more people, while creating economic oppor

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I’m sitting writing this and drinking Bumbleroot’s Baobab Drink Mix (it’s the Lemongrass right now…I’m trying to decide if it’s my favorite flavor…it’s in a neck to neck tie with Pineapple Vanilla at this point).

Two and a half years ago, I was sitting at Starbucks in Boulder with the charming Chef Barr Hogan, asking how we could create a drink using Baobab, a nutrient-packed fruit I’d found while volunteering in Zimbabwe.  I wanted to create a drink that would get the superfruit to more people, while creating economic opportunity for the people in Africa who harvest the fruit.  It was April 2011.  “Can we get something on shelves by July,” I asked Barr.  She laughed.

Now, in November 2013, we have a product to put on shelves. 

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I am so grateful that I was ridiculously ignorant in understanding how difficult it would be to create a new product using a little-known ingredient and how long it would take.  If I had known, I may have never started on this journey.  But I am so glad I did and I thought I’d share a few observations I’ve had along the way.

1) People are amazing.  Bumbleroot has been influenced and created by numerous people – more than I can even mention on this post.   And looking back, I’m humbled and amazed at how the right people have contributed to Bumbleroot at just the right times.

In the early days, when I was just thinking through what Bumbleroot would or could or should be (it didn’t even have a name), long conversations with Tamsin Chislett and Margaret Rose (co-worker and boss in Zimbabwe with TechnoServe) helped grow ideas into something tangible.

When we needed a logo, I happened to meet the phenomenally talented graphic designer Michelle Polizzi through mutual friends at a food truck party (she has since become one of my dearest friends) and she created the logo and design for Bumbleroot that perfectly represented our brand.

When we needed to better focus on what the Bumbleroot brand would stand for, two friends and brand experts from business school came to the rescue – Julia Kropp and Jamin Hemenway.

When we first started, I really wanted to source the Baobab from Zimbabwe, but there wasn’t a supply chain set up yet.  And then thanks to the efforts of Gus Le Breton and many others, there was!  And they were so gracious in letting me travel to meet the baobab harvesters first hand so I could really understand the process and understand how baobab could help improve their lives.

When we needed a chef to help develop the product, I was introduced to Chef Barr Hogan, and then when I moved to Singapore for a year, my flatmate Matt White (also a chef) joined the effort.  This international tag team developed some great drinks!

Then we needed an attorney, and a good friend, Liz Oertle jumped to the rescue.

Then we decided to start increasing our social media presence and launch an Indiegogo campaign and a childhood friend entered the picture – Currie Corbin with the experience of heading marketing for a lifestyle and wellness company.  In addition, to great marketing insight, he brought laughs and lightened up the most strenuous days.

Nick Polizzi, internet marketing expert extraordinaire continuously provides incredible advise on how to get our message out.

Karen Bridges did an MBA project on Bumbleroot, offering fantastic marketing insights into opportunities and challenges.

To understand the financial end of things, friends Brendan McDermott, Renard Ihlenfeld,  Bob  Myers, John Giles helped look through term sheets and advise on how we could best fund the company.

And then when we needed funding for the first production run – hundreds of friends and family and strangers joined the effort by supporting Bumbleroot’s Indiegogo campaign.  I don’t think I’ll ever be able to thank the Indiegogo supporters enough!

Once the product finally arrived, we participated in a Pitch Slam put on by the wonderful folks at Naturally Boulder, and were took by complete surprise when we were a top three finalist!  The support and input from the Boulder community following that event has been overwhelming (in the best of ways)!

And so many other people have been so helpful along the way – taste testing, offering support, advice, and introductions.  Thank you!

People ask why I always use “we” when talking about Bumbleroot, and it’s because it’s a group effort.  Bumbleroot is everyone who’s helped support and grow it.

2) First production runs don’t go perfectly.  Everyone I talked to who has ever done a production run for anything told me this.  And I thought we could be the exception.  Haha.  Silly me!  

But we’re learning and taking the insights we learned to make the next run even better.  The Pineapple Vanilla flavor is clumping – but we know how to fix it next time. 

We’re taking input on all the flavors and will tweak the formulations for the next run.  Maybe we’ll add more baobab into the drinks, maybe we’ll make them sweeter, maybe we’ll switch out a flavor for another.  We’re waiting from the feedback from you, so let us know how you’d make the drinks better.

3) The journey continues and Bumbleroot will continue to evolve.  We’re excited about creating new products, bringing more stories to our customers, having more impact.  But as we change, we’ll stick by three principles:

  • Supporting sustainable agriculture practices and fair prices for farmers and harvesters
  • Creating healthy and delicious products
  • Using the most eco-friendly packaging we can

So what now?  We need to get into stores!  I have become a bit of a stalker to grocery buyers in the Boulder/Denver and San Francisco/Berkeley areas.  Hanging out at the stores, calling A LOT, repeated e-mails.  Buyers are some of the hardest to get ahold of people ever! (Not all, but most : )).  If anyone has any advice on how to get five minutes with these elusive gatekeepers to the supermarket shelves, please let me know.  Bribes of drinks, kombucha, dates with cute single friends?

Oh…and we have an online store now!  Check it out and if you can, please spread the word.  We added a small sample pack <$10 with shipping to try all three flavors to make it affordable to find your favorite flavor.  Click here to go to Bumbleroot’s online shop.

Not only are we selling the Baobab Drink Mixes, but pure organic Baobab powder is also for sale, to add to your smoothies, oatmeal, etc.  Click here for a delicious smoothie recipe created by Chef Matt White. 

Until November 21, we are offering 10% online products.  Just use the code: THANKYOU

And thank you to each of you, from the bottom of my heart for supporting Bumbleroot.  We’ll continue to keep you up to date as we grow and evolve.

 – Sara


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Baobab Smoothie Recipe (Dairy Free and Gluten Free)

Did you know Baobab powder has 10x more antioxidants than acai or goji berry, acts as a prebiotic, and that one serving (2T) has 24% of your daily recommended dietary fiber and 25% of your daily recommended Vitamin C? It's also a source of potassium and magnesium. So how do you add this new superfruit into your diet? Bumbleroot’s plant-based, endurance athlete Chef Matt White came up with this recipe while training for the Ironman. Matt says: This smoothie is a complete meal replacement, containing protein, essential amino acids, complex carbohydrates and almost all of the dail

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BRF-131104-Blog_smoothie

Did you know Baobab powder has 10x more antioxidants than acai or goji berry, acts as a prebiotic, and that one serving (2T) has 24% of your daily recommended dietary fiber and 25% of your daily recommended Vitamin C? It’s also a source of potassium and magnesium.

So how do you add this new superfruit into your diet?

Bumbleroot’s plant-based, endurance athlete Chef Matt White came up with this recipe while training for the Ironman.

Matt says:

This smoothie is a complete meal replacement, containing protein, essential amino acids, complex carbohydrates and almost all of the daily vitamins your body needs.

Drink it for breakfast, as a pre-workout meal or as an after workout drink.

I used Baobab in all my smoothies in training leading up to the Ironman race.  It provided sustained energy throughout the day, even after intense workout sessions.  It also provided extra vitamins and amino acids to help keep me healthy when my immune system was depleted.

INGREDIENTS

Makes two servings.

2 T Baobab Powder

3/4 cup of Almond Milk, more or  less depending on desired thickness

2 Cups of Spinach

1 Cup Pineapple, chopped

1 Apple, sliced

6-7 Brazil Nuts

1 Beet, two if small, skin removed

1/2 Haas Avocado

1/2 Cup of Blueberries

1 T Chia Seed

2 T Organic Peanut Butter

1/2 Cup of Ice

To get Baobab powder, check out our online store .


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Can Superfoods Help Solve Malnutrition?

Throughout Africa, there are pockets of areas that are habitually drought-prone.  With little access to water or income opportunities, malnourishment is a serious problem.  According to Save the Children, "malnutrition is an underlying cause of death of 2.6 million children each year -- one third of the global total of children's deaths." In areas with extreme weather (drought, heat, cold), mother nature has addressed this problem by creating superfood plants.  Many superfoods come from areas where the plants have had to work extra hard to survive.  Protecting themselves from extreme weather by creating phytochemicals, these plants c

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Throughout Africa, there are pockets of areas that are habitually drought-prone.  With little access to water or income opportunities, malnourishment is a serious problem.  According to Save the Children, “malnutrition is an underlying cause of death of 2.6 million children each year — one third of the global total of children’s deaths.”

In areas with extreme weather (drought, heat, cold), mother nature has addressed this problem by creating superfood plants.  Many superfoods come from areas where the plants have had to work extra hard to survive.  Protecting themselves from extreme weather by creating phytochemicals, these plants can provide much-needed nutritional benefits to the people who live in the areas where they grow.

Baobab is a tree that grows in Africa’s most arid regions.  The superfruit from the tree contains all essential amino acides, antioxidants, dietary fiber, calcium, vitamin C, potassium, and magnesium.

Unfortunately, baobab and other local foods, with are jam-packed with antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals are often shunned for being too “traditional” or as foods that are for “poor” people.  Even when in scarce supply, food can be a status symbol, and eating purchased maize (corn) mean instead of free and readily available baobab, indicates a level of upward mobility that is a sense of pride.

Luckily, in some areas, there is a shift in this thinking and it’s starting at Whole Foods and your local organic food stores.  The demand for superfoods from the United States, Europe, and Asia is giving these foods value in the communities from which they are harvested.  Now that there is a dollar amount associated with baobab, it’s slowing shifting from a “poor” person food to a viable food options (and a highly nutritious one!).

Gus Le Breton, CEO of Bio-Innovation Zimbabwe, explains this shift, along with the economic opportunities that Baobab provides in the video below:

Gus le Breton on Baobab, economic opportunity, and nutrition

 


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Vote for a healthier world…three times a day.

  Happy Earth Day from all of us at Bumbleroot! Over the past year, we’ve come across a few facts that shocked us. Did you know: - The agriculture sector uses 70% of our earth’s accessible freshwater? - One-third of greenhouse gas emissions come from agriculture? - Food packaging accounts for about one-third of municipal waste in the United States? The design of our food system greatly impacts the health of our earth and our bodies. And there are thousands of ways we can do better. Water use can be reduced by fixing leaky irrigation systems and growing environment-appropriate plants. Synthetic fertilizer can be repl

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Happy Earth Day from all of us at Bumbleroot!

Over the past year, we’ve come across a few facts that shocked us.

Did you know:

– The agriculture sector uses 70% of our earth’s accessible freshwater?

– One-third of greenhouse gas emissions come from agriculture?

– Food packaging accounts for about one-third of municipal waste in the United States?

The design of our food system greatly impacts the health of our earth and our bodies. And there are thousands of ways we can do better. Water use can be reduced by fixing leaky irrigation systems and growing environment-appropriate plants. Synthetic fertilizer can be replaced with organic fertilizer, compost, or manure. Farmers can cut pesticide use by creating habitats that support beneficial insects (those that eat the bad ones). Food packaging can be redesigned to produce less waste.

Luckily, we get to vote for the food system we want three times a day – or for some of us who really like to eat…many more! We can choose to eat more veggies and fruits (which for the most part, use less water and energy than other food choices), eat at restaurants that source local or sustainably grown food, choose organic at the grocery store, or join a CSA to support local organic agriculture.

At Bumbleroot, we’re working to provide you with more ways to choose a way of eating and living that is healthier for you and the world. In July, we’ll be launching our first product – a tasty drink mix with all organic ingredients. Coconut water loaded with electrolytes and Baobab, an African superfruit, jam-packed with antixidants (10X more than Acai or Goji berries) are combined with organic fruits and herbs to provide a delicious, nutritious drink.

We pack the drink powder in pocket-sized packaging that can go anywhere you go and can be added into your reusable water bottle or glass. No more plastic bottles to throw away or to get lost under the seat of your car. We source from farmers using sustainable farming and harvesting practices – ensuring that our drinks are good for you and the planet.

Best of all, we will reinvest in these farming communities by giving back a percentage of our proceeds so that they can continue to grow healthy, sustainable food.

We can’t wait for you to try these drinks and to let us know what you think. Meanwhile, we want to continue a dialogue with you about the choices you make to live a healthy life that supports a healthy planet. How do you vote with your food?

– Sara

 

 

Sources:

Clay, J. (2004) World Agriculture and the Environment: A Commodity-by-Commodity Guide to Impacts and Practices Island Press via WWF

Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR)

GreenDustries.com


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Welcome to the Bumbleroot blog!

At Bumbleroot, we've been building a product we love. It's a beverage brimming with energizing electrolytes courtesy of coconut water, just one of its delicious and nutritious ingredients. Better yet, our new drink boasts baobab fruit, the African superfood that’s jam-packed with oodles of great things like antioxidants, vitamin C, potassium, calcium, and magnesium. And that means our drinks are, too.

We’re excited that our drinks are so delicious. We’re even more excited that they’re good for you and Mother Earth, too. Did you know that two million plastic bottles are dis

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BumbleRoot PackagingAt Bumbleroot, we’ve been building a product we love. It’s a beverage brimming with energizing electrolytes courtesy of coconut water, just one of its delicious and nutritious ingredients. Better yet, our new drink boasts baobab fruit, the African superfood that’s jam-packed with oodles of great things like antioxidants, vitamin C, potassium, calcium, and magnesium. And that means our drinks are, too.

We’re excited that our drinks are so delicious. We’re even more excited that they’re good for you and Mother Earth, too. Did you know that two million plastic bottles are discarded every five minutes in the United States alone? We didn’t either. But when we saw this gut-wrenching statistic, we vowed our product would not to be part of the problem. Instead of plastic bottles, our brilliant beverages are in powder form so that the packaging is as minimal as possible. The pocket-sized packaging means it’s also easy to keep on hand — or in pocket, purse, backpack, briefcase, diaper bag, sports bag, sports bra, passport cover… You get the idea.

But at Bumbleroot we’ve been building more than products — we’ve been building a company we love, too. A company that represents the things we care about: top-notch nutrition, sustainable agriculture, fair prices for farmers, and, of course, scrumptious snacks.

Each day we ask ourselves: Is there a better way to do the things we do? Is there a more nutritious ingredient? Is there packaging available that’s even better for the environment? Are our suppliers being paid fairly?

We’ve been chewing over these questions, and in so doing we’ve realized that there’s a lot of improvements to be made in the way food products are made and food companies are run. We’re not perfect, but we’re working hard to get close. Our goal is to create a company that we can be proud of so that you can, too.

As we continue foraging our path, Bumbleroot wants to include you, our customers, in this dialogue. And that’s what this blog is for. It’s meant to be a way in which to seed, sprout, cultivate, and grow awesome ideas. We’ll be hearing from experts on agricultural development, packaging, the environment, nutrition, and many other issues that influence this business. And we’ll be sharing stories about Bumbleroot’s ingredients, as well as the men and women who grow and harvest these unique foods.

So pull up a chair and join the discussion!

-Sara


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