Bumbleroot’s Story

Whether you've been part of the Bumbleroot community for awhile or are brand new, we are so glad you're here. We hope you love our products, and today we also wanted to share our storyand why we do what we do. From our Founder, Sara: Seven years ago, I left a corporate job in Chicago to move to Zimbabwe. Years before, I had been a policy advisor to a U.S. Senator on agriculture issues, and I knew that: 

  • 1/2 of the world lives on $2.50 a day or less. 
  • The majority of those people engage in small scale agriculture. 
  • Conventional farming methods (utilizing expensive synthetic fertilizer and pesticides) were being promoted to these farmers in developing countries.
  • Agr

    read more >

Whether you’ve been part of the Bumbleroot community for awhile or are brand new, we are so glad you’re here.

We hope you love our products, and today we also wanted to share our storyand why we do what we do.

From our Founder, Sara:

Seven years ago, I left a corporate job in Chicago to move to Zimbabwe. Years before, I had been a policy advisor to a U.S. Senator on agriculture issues, and I knew that: 

  • 1/2 of the world lives on $2.50 a day or less. 
  • The majority of those people engage in small scale agriculture. 
  • Conventional farming methods (utilizing expensive synthetic fertilizer and pesticides) were being promoted to these farmers in developing countries.
  • Agriculture had the potential to impact climate change (both negatively and positively – in a big way).

But I also knew there was only so much I could learn from reading. I wanted to be on the ground, and meet these farmers and see for myself how agriculture could be used as a force for good: for higher incomes, for better nutrition, for better soil and water. 

The pull to Africa grew stronger and stronger, and in 2010, I found myself on a plane heading to a country I’d never been to, where I didn’t know another person. I remember thinking while I was on the plane that this was either the best or worst decision of my life. 

I arrived shortly after the country begun to use the U.S. dollar as currency after a run of trillion percent inflation.  There was so little currency circulating, that the dollars that were being used were used over and over and looked like they had been thrown in the mud, crinkled up, and then air-dried. After handling the cash, it was imperative to wash your hands.

Just a few years earlier, the country had been the “bread basket of Africa” – producing and exporting the food that was consumed throughout Africa and Europe. Land reform and redistribution (too long to cover here, but in short – it was violent and poorly executed), had left the most productive land unused (and disputed), while small farmers were working to try to feed themselves on less than prime land (and usually on just a few acres) and in the midst of a recovering economy.


The agriculture industry and NGOs in the country were working together to figure out a way to bring these small farmers into the food value chain. It was in the interest of everyone – food processors needed ingredients to produce food products, farmers needed income, seed producers needed to sell seeds, etc. 

I was working with the agriculture industry through an NGO and we all had the best of intentions and wanted these small farmers to be able to grow more food. Prevalent thinking was that the best way for farmers to grow more food was to use certain seeds, use a certain amount of fertilizer, and a certain amount of fertilizer and voila – in a season there would be corn, wheat, or soy. 

While we were working out the difficult puzzle of how small farmers could afford seeds, fertilizers, and pesticides when only farming a few acres, I was coming across amazing wild harvested foods in the rural areas. The King (or Queen) of these wild foods, was the Baobab fruit. Growing on majestic and gnarly trees that were hundreds to thousands of year old, these fruits had been traditionally used as food, drink, and medicine in the villages. 

Recent studies showed that the fruit had more antioxidants than acai or goji berries, was high in Vitamin C, and was a great source of dietary fiber. When the fruit was ripe, it fell to the ground. It cost nothing to pick up and harvest. Because it was readily available, it had at some point become considered “poor people food” and had a stigma attached to it. While children readily ate the candy-like fruit, adults shunned it. 

But what if the baobab fruit could be harvested and made into products? Local harvesters could receive income with no investment; the ancient trees would have economic value, further protecting them from being cut down (for example – for a powerline for a mine – this happened); and more people could benefit from the fantastic nutritional profile of the fruit.

The only thing missing in the equation was connecting the baobab fruit and consumers. I ended up moving back to the U.S. and founded Bumbleroot to do just that. But I had never created a food product before. I knew I wanted it to be healthy. I knew I wanted the packaging to be as low-impact to the environment as possible, and I wanted to make sure we were supporting our sourcing communities.

It’s been a long journey, but this is what we’ve learned:

  • We can create products that are not only healthy, but are nutritionally dense and easy to incorporate into our everyday lives. 
  • We can celebrate and feature unique ingredients that promote biodiversity in our food supply chain and protect these plants going forward (did you know the world has lost 94% of its seed diversity in the last century). 
  • We can find and use ingredients that meet our level of integrity – in their most natural state possible, sustainably farmed or harvested, enhancing soil rather than degrading it, and providing a fair price to the people who grow or harvest the food.
  • We can use packaging that is less impactful for the environment and less wasteful. Our drink packets aren’t biodegradeable (yet), but produce less waste than the 80% of bottles that are thrown away. 
  • We can support our harvesters and farmers. In addition to paying fair prices, we are reinvesting a percentage of revenue back into oursupplying communities. This past year, that money went to purchasing books for the schools (voted on by the community). The income is making a difference in peoples lives and is helping pay for school fees, clinic visits, and wells.
  • Traditional foods are making a comeback. Throughout the world, local communities are rediscovering local plants and foods and are reintegrating them back into their diets and culture. In Zimbabwe, oursupplying communities are now consuming more Baobab after realizing that others were paying a high price for it.
  • We can show the food industry that packaged food can be created in a different way – in a way that supports the environment – featuring ingredients that support soil health and reduce carbon emissions; enhances health; and reduces packaging waste.
  • And, we are also learning, that our community is craving more community and information around healthy, sustainable, and biodiverse food

To that end, we have created a Facebook group: Bumbleroot Cafe that allows for a sharing of information and conversation on healthy food, sustainable supply chains, growing our own food, and unique recipes and stories that celebrate culture and geography. Join here. 

We have more products to come and more stories to share. Thank you for being a part of our journey.

Sara


minimize(-)leave a comment >>

Baobab Hydrating Face Mask

Barbara, a dear Bumbleroot friend, recently crafted a nourishing Baobab face mask to refresh and clean the skin and we’re obsessed. We’re delighted to share in what we know is a great way to keep your skin well hydrated as the seasons change. And, coconut oil + baobab? One of our favorite combinations!

We hope you feel just as refreshed after taking such good care of your skin! Happy hydrating!

read more >

Baobab Hydrating Mask Ingredients - Bowl with Coconut Oil and Baobab Powder
Barbara, a dear Bumbleroot friend, recently crafted a nourishing Baobab face mask to refresh and clean the skin and we’re obsessed. We’re delighted to share in what we know is a great way to keep your skin well hydrated as the seasons change. And, coconut oil + baobab? One of our favorite combinations!

We hope you feel just as refreshed after taking such good care of your skin!

Happy hydrating!

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp (or less) coconut oil
  • 1 tsp jojoba oil
  • 2 to 5 drops of lemongrass essential oil
  • 2 tbsp Bumbleroot Foods Baobab powder

 

Mixing baobab mask ingredients in bowlMethod

  1. Mix all ingredients together. We recommend using a small bowl or lid.
  2. Massage into skin, covering your entire face.
  3. Leave on for 10-15 minutes.
  4. Voila! Remove with a tissue.

 

Baobab Hydrating Mask with Baobab Powder Finished

 

It is not necessary to rinse off this mask – in fact, we recommend allowing your skin to absorb the remaining oil.

**As we’re sustainability mavens,  we’ve made sure the mask can be used as a moisturizer as well.**

To use as a moisturizer, lessen the ingredient amounts by half or more.

Then, apply as you would a facial oil:

  1. Apply to clean skin (a little damp is okay, and helps your skin absorb the oils).
  2. Dab on nose, chin, cheeks and forehead.
  3. Blend with gentle strokes.

This hydrating facial mask/moisturizer can be kept in an airtight jar, and stored in a cool, dry place, if you desire to mix up a batch for daily use. Coconut oil lasts well when mixed; but you may want to omit the lemongrass oil for a larger batch, and instead add it in daily.

Benefits

Coconut oil (moisturizing + antibacterial to cleanse the facial surface of bacteria)

Lemongrass (properties include anti-fungal, insecticidal, antiseptic, and anti-inflammation, and it is also, stimulating, relaxing, soothing, and balancing as an aromotherapy)

Baobab (high in vitamin C – which boosts collagen production, supporting smoother, brighter skin)
When combined, this is the miracle mixture that works to hydrate, refresh, and relax your skin!

Suitable for all skin types.

 
Baobab is a superfruit that has great things, like antioxidants,dietary fiber,vitamin C, vitamin B, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. The fruit – a big, coconut looking thing – comes from Africa’s picturesque baobab tree, known as the “Tree of Life.

One serving (about 2 tablespoons) contains 24% of your daily recommended dietary fiber and 25% of the daily recommended Vitamin C. And if that wasn’t enough, the fiber in the Baobab fruit pulp acts as a prebiotic – helping your gut grow its good bacteria so that you can better absorb nutrients. And it’s extremely alkaline with a PRAL value of -52. Its tangy and slightly sweet taste works well in smoothies, tomato sauce, desserts, and many other foods.


minimize(-)leave a comment >>

The Wild Harvest: Take the time to taste the wild berries

By: Bryan Jessop I just got back from the Sierra Nevada mountains where one thing is clear: it’s berry season. As I rumbled down dirt logging roads I passed elderberry bush after bush with branches sagging under the weight of their fruit. At my first stop I was picking thorny gooseberries by the leather-gloved handful. Then it was the golden currants and thimbleberries that finally presented me with the forager’s dilemma – too much fruit, too little time. You may have noticed that the prices of your favorite little fruits are bottoming out right now, and that means conditions are ripe for berries. And while jumbo-sized GMO strawberri

read more >

berries

By: Bryan Jessop

I just got back from the Sierra Nevada mountains where one thing is clear: it’s berry season. As I rumbled down dirt logging roads I passed elderberry bush after bush with branches sagging under the weight of their fruit. At my first stop I was picking thorny gooseberries by the leather-gloved handful. Then it was the golden currants and thimbleberries that finally presented me with the forager’s dilemma – too much fruit, too little time.

You may have noticed that the prices of your favorite little fruits are bottoming out right now, and that means conditions are ripe for berries. And while jumbo-sized GMO strawberries are an impressive triumph over nature and we all love the convenience of frozen blueberries, no farmed berry can compare to the intensity of flavor of its wild ancestor. Anyone who has tasted a wild strawberry or eaten a handful of ripe huckleberries can attest to that. In the process of designing berries for size and yield, we’ve sacrificed flavor and nutrition.

Berries taste good. In fact I would argue that they’re some of the tastiest natural foods out there. It’s why we flavor our candies and pies like them. And maybe there’s an evolutionary reason that we adore these flavors. Nutritionists will often point out the astonishing health benefits of berries, which are packed with brain-boosting antioxidant phytonutrients. Did you know that a single serving of farmed blueberries has as much antioxidants as five servings of broccoli or carrots? Now consider that a wild blueberry or huckleberry is smaller, which means more skin to volume and more antioxidants still. Top that with research showing that wild fruit is much higher in fiber, protein, vitamin C, calcium, iron, magnesium, and phosphorous, and you’ve got a pretty compelling case for picking those berries that are mostly left for the birds. In short, wild berries are superfoods.

So what’s out there right now? Blackberries must be the best known and most widely collected. Many of us know the joy of popping a sun-ripened blackberry straight off the vine and into your mouth. But northern California is host to a number of other wild berries. A partial list would include elderberries, thimbleberries, salmonberries, chokecherries, black and golden currants, Sierra gooseberries, white stemmed raspberries, wild grapes, wild strawberries, and both red and evergreen (aka purple) huckleberries. As the summer sun bakes our California landscapes, wild spaces become candy shops full of diverse and delightful treats.

I’ve been learning about some of the lesser-appreciated California berries as part of my venture to provide chefs with extraordinary local foods:

  • Thimbleberries look like red raspberries at first glance and actually they taste a bit like them too, but a more concentrated version. The vines with five-lobed leaves are ubiquitous both on the California coast and in the Sierras, but finding the berries is less common. The thin-fleshed fruit rests delicately on top of its round bud like a thimble. The fruit is delicate, slow to collect, difficult to transport, and doesn’t store very well. This makes it a forager’s berry, a berry to be eaten right off the bush. I like to crush them against the roof of my mouth and savor their single drop of heavenly nectar as it spreads across my tongue.

thimbleberry

 

  • Currants and gooseberries are some of the most common and widespread fruits in the Sierra Nevadas. Native peoples used to collect them in large quantities to process into pemmican – the original energy bar made from dried meat and berries. Both the leaves and berries of currants are tacky and fragrant. Once you identify one species of currant you’ll start seeing them all over. Their unique flavor and aroma – somewhere between a raison and black licorice – is unmistakable and makes them easy to ID. The leaves of currant bushes have the same scent, which gives them culinary value as well.

 

gooseberry2

blackcurrants

Sierra gooseberry is a low-lying shrub that’s related to currants. However unlike currants, the spiny skin of gooseberries means they need to be collected with thick gardening gloves and pulverized before eating.

sierra-gooseberry

  • Wild strawberries and white-stemmed raspberries are delicacies if you can find them – they seem to be the first berries discovered by hungry woodland critters. Only once have I come across a decent quantity of wild strawberries and I spent the rest of that afternoon shuffling around on my hands and knees gobbling them down and filling a small jar. I’m still looking for my first haul of wild raspberries – I’ve only found a few berries here and there – but the vines are common and easily distinguished from blackberry vines by their elegant, arching white stems. strawberry

 

OK, now I want to talk about elderberries. These may be the most abundant, unappreciated berries in California. The first thing you need to know is that the leaves, stems, and under-ripe berries are mildly toxic. Many sources suggest that even the ripe berries shouldn’t be eaten raw, but I’ve never had any problem eating small handfuls right off the bush. In fact, the flavor can vary significantly from bush to bush so I prefer to taste them before I start filling my pack. Good berries will be bright but not sour, like a mildly sweet blueberry, but with a subtle pungency. On rare occasions, I’ve encountered elderberries so pungent that I spit them out. But if you catch them at the right stage, a single berry cluster can weigh over a pound and even a small bush may have dozens of ripe clusters. How much do you need? It depends. To make a pint of shrub, only about a cup. For a gallon of wine, you’ll need at least 5 pounds of cleaned berries.

 

elderberry

 

Elderberry shrub is a classic preparation and very simple to make. A shrub is a vinegar-syrup. Just combine 1 cup crushed elderberries with 1 cup apple cider vinegar. Let it sit overnight to infuse the vinegar, then strain into a pot and add 1 cup sugar. Boil long enough to dissolve the sugar, then bottle and store indefinitely in the fridge. Mix it into sparkling water for a refreshing summer drink or use it straight in place of balsamic.

As with any craft, the process for making elderberry wine is only as complicated as the skill of the artisan allows. I’m a novice to fermentation, so I’m trying a simple recipe from Los Angeles forager Pascal Baudar’s book The New Wildcrafted Cuisine. The ingredients are elderberry juice, water, sugar, yeast, and time – it should be ready to drink in about a year.

While it typically takes only a few minutes at the right bush to collect your fill of elderberries, most wild berries are far less forgiving.

Consider the delectable huckleberry. By the middle of August, huckleberries are beginning to ripen on our foggy north coast. While at the peak of the season it can look like a veritable smorgasbord, just try collecting enough for a single pie. Picking huckleberries in any large quantity can be daunting – I can get about 2 lbs per hour when I’m in a flow state. Cleaning them can be tedious and takes equally long.

Are huckleberries really worth all this trouble? Yes. Yes they are. Personally I can never get enough – I would eat my weight in huckleberries each year if I could afford it. Not only are they my favorite-tasting berry and one of my all-around favorite foods, they are truly one of the healthiest foods we can eat. Last season I was lucky to meet a forager on the Oregon coast who sold me his haul. Even the forager-direct price would have been astronomical for any domesticated berry, but having gathered and processed them myself I knew I got a great deal. This season I’ll buy all I can get my hands on for chefs and friends who want to supplement their take. Maybe I’ll even splurge and make a huckleberry pie.

Many people are content to munch on a few berries as they hike, but for those who want to satisfy their huck cravings year-round, here are some tips for obtaining a larger harvest:

  • Equipment. Good foraging attire is a must. It can be wet in the fog, and once you get into it you may find yourself crawling over thickets of vegetation to get the best vantage on a productive bush. I wear long pants, ankle-high boots, a long sleeved shirt or jacket, and a hat. For your berry repository, I recommend a large bucket or tub that you can hang around your shoulders by a strap or rope. This will free your hands to work the berries, and the larger the bucket, the fewer berries you’ll lose to the ground.

bryan

 

  • Timing and location. Wait to harvest until most of the berries are ripe, typically August through October. Huckleberry bushes are common along the coast, especially with bishop pine. The trick is finding bushes that produce berries, and for that they need sunlight. Look for clearings and edges of forested areas, then hone in on the bushes that are the most prolific berry producers.

 

  • Technique. I’ve learned of two main techniques for getting these berries into your bucket: tickling and spanking. Tickling is the process of working your way along the branches and dislodging the ripe berries using all your fingers. It’s a bit slower but results in less debris (read: less cleaning) than spanking. Spanking is the technique of hitting the branches with your hand to loose the berries into your bucket. You have to calibrate the force of your spanks – too many green berries means you’re hitting the bush too hard, not enough ripe berries means you need to spank a little harder. Most importantly, whatever technique you choose, don’t forget to eat the berries as you pick.

 

  • Cleaning. To clean my huckleberries, first I fill the collecting bucket/tub with water. Most of the berries will sink while debris (dried flowers, leaves, insects, etc.) float to the top. Scoop out the floating debris and your berries will already look dramatically better. If you have access to a huckleberry ramp, now is the time to use it. When you pour your haul down a gentle incline, the round berries will roll to the bottom, leaving a lot of debris and mushy berries behind. The final step is the manual process of picking out the remaining green and rotten berries, large stems and any remaining debris by hand. I tolerate the small stems and some under-ripe berries, and would even argue that they enhance the flavor with complex bitterness and forest notes.

 

  • Storage: A bowl full of freshly cleaned huckleberries is a wonderful thing to behold. It looks like berry caviar. The berries will last at least a week in refrigeration, but I immediately freeze what I know I want to store. Lay them out in a single layer on a sheet pan to freeze so they don’t stick together, then transfer to plastic bags or tubs.

I love sharing my foraged finds with others, but I’ll admit I get stingy when it comes to huckleberries. I set aside a small amount to be eaten fresh, then stash the rest away in the freezer. Throughout the year, I’ll thaw them out one handful at a time and put them in my morning granola, cereal, and pancakes – any time I think I need a boost of nutrition or when I’m feeling worthy of a hard-earned treat.

What’s your favorite wild berry? Any harvesting tips or recipe ideas? Let me know!

Bryan Jessop is a professional forager and wild food enthusiast. His wild berries, mushrooms, greens, and edible flowers can be found on the menus of some of San Francisco’s finest restaurants. Follow his business Morchella Wild Foods on Facebook or Instagram, or check out his website www.morchellawildfoods.com to see what sustainable wild foods are in-season and in-demand from SF’s top chefs.


minimize(-)leave a comment >>

Baobab Veggie Balls with Sweet Potato and Beet

Baobab adds a new twist to the veggie burger. We hope you enjoy these savory non-meat balls as much as we do!

Ingredients:
  • 1 medium sweet potato
  • 1 medium carrot
  • 2 packed grated medium sized beetroot
  • ½ c finely chopped red onion
  • 1 clove garlic, finely chopped
  • ¼ tsp chili powder
  • ½ tsp cumin powder
  • 1 tsp dried dill
  • 2 tbsp corn flour
  • 2 tbsp baobab
  • read more >

Baobab Veggie Balls with Sweet Potato and Beet

Baobab adds a new twist to the veggie burger. We hope you enjoy these savory non-meat balls as much as we do!

Ingredients:

  • 1 medium sweet potato
  • 1 medium carrot
  • 2 packed grated medium sized beetroot
  • ½ c finely chopped red onion
  • 1 clove garlic, finely chopped
  • ¼ tsp chili powder
  • ½ tsp cumin powder
  • 1 tsp dried dill
  • 2 tbsp corn flour
  • 2 tbsp baobab
  • salt to taste
    Baobab Veggie Balls

    Method:

    1. Heat a teaspoon of coconut oil in a cast iron skillet and add in the chopped red onion and garlic. Sauté until the red onions are translucent.

    2. Add in the grated beetroot, sweet potato, and carrot, cumin, salt, chili powder,and dill. Cover the pan and simmer on low heat until the beetroot and sweet potato have turned soft.

    3. Turn off the heat and allow the mixture to cool completely. Once cooled, add in the corn flour and baobab powder.

    4. Make small lime sized balls or go big with a burger. You can cook them by baking for 30 minutes at 375 degrees or pan fry them up in a low heat.

Baobab is a superfruit that has great things, like antioxidants,dietary fiber,vitamin C, vitamin B, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. The fruit – a big, coconut looking thing – comes from Africa’s picturesque baobab tree, known as the “Tree of Life.

One serving (about 2 tablespoons) contains 24% of your daily recommended dietary fiber and 25% of the daily recommended Vitamin C. And if that wasn’t enough, the fiber in the Baobab fruit pulp acts as a prebiotic – helping your gut grow its good bacteria so that you can better absorb nutrients. And it’s extremely alkaline with a PRAL value of -52. Its tangy and slightly sweet taste works well in smoothies, tomato sauce, desserts, and many other foods.


minimize(-)leave a comment >>

Raw Cacao Baobab Energy Bars with Moringa

Combining two African superfoods - Baobab and Moringa - these bars are great to take on a hike or to just keep at the desk.

Ingredients

For the base:

  • 1 and 1/2 cups of raw soaked nuts: We used cashews, pecans and almonds are great too!
  • 1 cup or less of pitted dates
  • 1 cup or less dried, unsweetened cherries (or dried dehydrated fruit of choice)
  • 2 tbsp raw, shelled hemp seeds
  • 1 tbsp of Moringa powder
  • read more >

Raw Cacao Baobab Energy Bars with Moringa

Combining two African superfoods – Baobab and Moringa – these bars are great to take on a hike or to just keep at the desk.

Ingredients

For the base:

  • 1 and 1/2 cups of raw soaked nuts: We used cashews, pecans and almonds are great too!
  • 1 cup or less of pitted dates
  • 1 cup or less dried, unsweetened cherries (or dried dehydrated fruit of choice)
  • 2 tbsp raw, shelled hemp seeds
  • 1 tbsp of Moringa powder
  • 2 tbsp of Baobab Powder

For the cacao topping:

  • 1/2 cup cacao nibs
  • 2 tbsp finely ground coffee
  • 1 and a half tbsp of raw coconut butter
  • 1/2 tbsp or raw honey

*for extra creaminess, add more coconut butter and/or honey. Alternatives: handful of cashews or half an avocado

After soaking the nuts, add them to the food processor and grind until they’ve been finely ground. Add in the dates, then cherries, baobab and moringa powder and blend until the consistency is smooth and sticky. Add in the hemp seeds with only a few pulses (they don’t need to be too deeply ground). Take your base and press into whatever dish you’re using: shallow pie pan, cupcake molds, or even just a plate.

Add all topping ingredients to the food processor. Continue to pulse until the nibs are at a desired consistency. For a much smoother, creamier topping, add more coconut butter (or listed alternatives) until it’s the density of a smoothie. For a crunchier bite, let up on a pulsing so that the nibs are aren’t completely ground. Add more honey or a few dates if you don’t find it sweet enough. However, because the base is so sweet try to leave the topping less so. Pour, or spread, atop your base. Freeze for a hour or refrigerate for longer. The bars should last for about a week!

Baobab is a superfruit that has great things, like antioxidants,dietary fiber, vitamin C, vitamin B, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. The fruit – a big, coconut looking thing – comes from Africa’s picturesque baobab tree, known as the “Tree of Life.

One serving (about 2 tablespoons) contains 24% of your daily recommended dietary fiber and 25% of the daily recommended Vitamin C. And if that wasn’t enough, the fiber in the Baobab fruit pulp acts as a prebiotic – helping your gut grow its good bacteria so that you can better absorb nutrients. And it’s extremely alkaline with a PRAL value of -52. Its tangy and slightly sweet taste works well in smoothies, tomato sauce, desserts, and many other foods.


minimize(-)leave a comment >>

Baobab & Blueberry Buckwheat Pancakes

 

Who said pancakes can't be healthy? Add some zing and a nutritional punch to your breakfast by adding Baobab powder to your pancakes.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup buckwheat flour (100g)
  • 1 cup almond milk (200ml)
  • 2 tbsp flaxseed mixed with 4 tbsp water
  • read more >

 

pancakes

Who said pancakes can’t be healthy? Add some zing and a nutritional punch to your breakfast by adding Baobab powder to your pancakes.

Ingredients

  • 1 cup buckwheat flour (100g)
  • 1 cup almond milk (200ml)
  • 2 tbsp flaxseed mixed with 4 tbsp water
  • 1 tbsp baobab powder
  • 1 tbsp maple syrup
  • 1/2 cup blueberries (frozen or fresh)

Baobab Pancakes

Start by making your flax ‘eggs’. Mix the flaxseed and water together in a bowl and leave to thicken up for 5 minutes. Add the buckwheat flour and baobab to a bowl and mix together then add the almond milk, maple syrup, the now thicken flax mixture and blueberries. Stir well. Heat a little coconut oil in a frying pan over a medium heat. Using a large spoon transfer some of the mixture to the pan to make a pancake. After a minute or so the sides of the pancake should begin to brown and little bubbles will appear. At this point flip the pancake over using a spatula and cook for another minute or two on the other side. Repeat these steps until you’ve run out of mixture! You should end up with around 5-6 pancakes to enjoy!

Baobab is a superfruit that has great things, like antioxidants,dietary fibervitamin Cvitamin Bcalciummagnesium, and potassium. The fruit – a big, coconut looking thing – comes from Africa’s picturesque baobab tree, known as the “Tree of Life.

One serving (about 2 tablespoons) contains 24% of your daily recommended dietary fiber and 25% of the daily recommended Vitamin C. And if that wasn’t enough, the fiber in the Baobab fruit pulp acts as a prebiotic – helping your gut grow its good bacteria so that you can better absorb nutrients. And it’s extremely alkaline with a PRAL value of -52. Its tangy and slightly sweet taste works well in smoothies, tomato sauce, desserts, and many other foods.

 


minimize(-)leave a comment >>

Zesty Green Baobab Smoothie

Are you adding Baobab into your morning smoothie? The sweet, tart, and tangy taste plus the numerous nutritional benefits - Vitamin C, Dietary Fiber, Antioxidants, and more give a boost to any smoothie. We love this smoothie from our guest chef @nourishingamelia

Ingredients -
  • 1 apple
  • 1 stick of celery
  • 2 handfuls of spinach
  • 1 heaping tsp of Baobab powder
  • Juice of half

    read more >

smoothie

Are you adding Baobab into your morning smoothie? The sweet, tart, and tangy taste plus the numerous nutritional benefits – Vitamin C, Dietary Fiber, Antioxidants, and more give a boost to any smoothie. We love this smoothie from our guest chef @nourishingamelia

Ingredients –

  • 1 apple
  • 1 stick of celery
  • 2 handfuls of spinach
  • 1 heaping tsp of Baobab powder
  • Juice of half a lime
  • 1 1/2 cups of water (300 ml)

Core and chop your apple. Pour the water into your blender followed by all the other ingredients. Blend until smooth. Pour into a glass and enjoy!!

Baobab is a superfruit that has great things, like antioxidants,dietary fibervitamin Cvitamin Bcalciummagnesium, and potassium. The fruit – a big, coconut looking thing – comes from Africa’s picturesque baobab tree, known as the “Tree of Life.

One serving (about 2 tablespoons) contains 24% of your daily recommended dietary fiber and 25% of the daily recommended Vitamin C. And if that wasn’t enough, the fiber in the Baobab fruit pulp acts as a prebiotic – helping your gut grow its good bacteria so that you can better absorb nutrients. And it’s extremely alkaline with a PRAL value of -52. Its tangy and slightly sweet taste works well in smoothies, tomato sauce, desserts, and many other foods.


minimize(-)leave a comment >>

Cacao Orange & Baobab Oatmeal

A sweet and healthy way to start the day! Ingredients:

Steps: 1. Pour the almond milk into a saucepan and place on a medium heat. 2. Once the almond milk has heated (after 3-4 minutes) add the oats, honey and zest of half an orange. Keep the heat on low-medium and

read more >

Cacao Orange & Baobab OatmealA sweet and healthy way to start the day!

Ingredients:

Steps:
1. Pour the almond milk into a saucepan and place on a medium heat.
2. Once the almond milk has heated (after 3-4 minutes) add the oats, honey and zest of half an orange. Keep the heat on low-medium and stir frequently.
3. Once the oats have absorbed the almond milk and you’ve got your desired consistency (mine takes about 10 minutes) take off the heat and stir in the baobab.
4. Pour your oatmeal into a bowl then top with chopped orange segments, cacao nibs and chopped almonds if you’re using them – they give a delicious crunch!
5. Dig in and enjoy!

 

Baobab is a superfruit that has great things, like antioxidants,dietary fibervitamin Cvitamin Bcalciummagnesium, and potassium. The fruit – a big, coconut looking thing – comes from Africa’s picturesque baobab tree, known as the “Tree of Life.

One serving (about 2 tablespoons) contains 24% of your daily recommended dietary fiber and 25% of the daily recommended Vitamin C. And if that wasn’t enough, the fiber in the Baobab fruit pulp acts as a prebiotic – helping your gut grow its good bacteria so that you can better absorb nutrients. And it’s extremely alkaline with a PRAL value of -52. Its tangy and slightly sweet taste works well in smoothies, tomato sauce, desserts, and many other foods.


minimize(-)leave a comment >>

Lemon Baobab Cheesecake

Nom nom nom...not only does Baobab fruit pack a nutritional punch (more antioxidants than blueberries, Vitamin C, dietary fiber, etc...), its tart and tangy taste makes for a delicious addition to so many different of recipes. This cheesecake is dairy-free, gluten-free, and full of ingredients that are actually good for you! We love this recipe from our guest chef @nourishingamelia. Ingredients Base - • 1 1/2 cups almonds (200g)&

read more >

IMG_2809

Nom nom nom…not only does Baobab fruit pack a nutritional punch (more antioxidants than blueberries, Vitamin C, dietary fiber, etc…), its tart and tangy taste makes for a delicious addition to so many different of recipes. This cheesecake is dairy-free, gluten-free, and full of ingredients that are actually good for you! We love this recipe from our guest chef @nourishingamelia.

Ingredients

Base –

• 1 1/2 cups almonds (200g) 

• 1 1/2 cups medjool dates (approx. 10)

• 2 tbsp coconut oil

Cheesecake filling –

• 2 cups cashews (230g) soaked overnight

1/4 cup (2 tbsp) baobab powder

• 1/3 cup (3 tbsp) coconut oil

• Juice & zest of 2 small-medium lemons 

• 1/4 cup (3 tbsp) pure maple syrup 

IMG_2811

Directions

1. Soak the cashews overnight or for a minimum of 4 hours before making your cheesecake.

2. Place the almonds in a food processor and blitz until broken down, then add in the pitted dates & coconut oil and blend again.

3. Transfer the sticky crust mixture into a cake tin (I used 18inch), spread out evenly and press down so the mixture is nicely compact.

4. Place your cake tin into the freezer while you make the cheesecake filling.

5. Drain the soaked cashews and put them into the food processor along with all the other filling ingredients.

6. Blend until you get a creamy, smooth mixture. This may take a few minutes.

7. Remove the cake tin from the freezer and pour the filling mixture onto the now set crust. Spread evenly.

8. Place the cheesecake back into the freezer for 2 hours to set.

9. After 2 hours you can remove the cheesecake from the freezer, leave it to thaw for 10 minutes then it’s ready to slice and eat!

 

Baobab is a superfruit that has great things, like antioxidants,dietary fibervitamin Cvitamin Bcalciummagnesium, and potassium. The fruit – a big, coconut looking thing – comes from Africa’s picturesque baobab tree, known as the “Tree of Life.

One serving (about 2 tablespoons) contains 24% of your daily recommended dietary fiber and 25% of the daily recommended Vitamin C. And if that wasn’t enough, the fiber in the Baobab fruit pulp acts as a prebiotic – helping your gut grow its good bacteria so that you can better absorb nutrients. And it’s extremely alkaline with a PRAL value of -52. Its tangy and slightly sweet taste works well in smoothies, tomato sauce, desserts, and many other foods.

 


minimize(-)leave a comment >>

Cacao & Baobab Superfood Mousse

This chocolate mousse tastes completely decadent, yet is chock-full of superfood goodness. (makes one serving, or two if you don't mind sharing :) ) 2 avocados 3 tablespoons of cacao powder 2 tablespoons of honey 1 tablespoon of Baobab Powder Blend in a food processor and enjoy!  

read more >

Cacao & Baobab Superfood Mousse

This chocolate mousse tastes completely decadent, yet is chock-full of superfood goodness.

(makes one serving, or two if you don’t mind sharing 🙂 )

2 avocados

3 tablespoons of cacao powder

2 tablespoons of honey

1 tablespoon of Baobab Powder

Blend in a food processor and enjoy!

 


minimize(-)leave a comment >>

Beet & Baobab Dip

  Did you know there’s a powder you can add to nearly anything to fortify your meals and add antioxidants, vitamin c, dietary fiber, prebiotics, and amino acids? And it’s a real fruit — that dries in its shell — to create a super nutritious sweet, tangy powder. And what’s even more amazing is that the fruit grows on a beautiful, ancient, gnarly tree in Africa, and when harvested, provides much needed income to the communities around it. Baobab fruit powder is just becoming known in the U.S. and is loved by

read more >

 

Beet & Baobab Dip

Did you know there’s a powder you can add to nearly anything to fortify your meals and add antioxidants, vitamin c, dietary fiber, prebiotics, and amino acids?

And it’s a real fruit — that dries in its shell — to create a super nutritious sweet, tangy powder.

And what’s even more amazing is that the fruit grows on a beautiful, ancient, gnarly tree in Africa, and when harvested, provides much needed income to the communities around it.

Baobab fruit powder is just becoming known in the U.S. and is loved by moms who add it into meals for their kids, by athletes who say it lowers their recovery time, and anyone who is looking for a way to eat healthier.

In February, we’re featuring #29daysofbaobab. We’ll be showcasing recipes, videos, and blogs about our favorite fruit. Follow along on our Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook pages.

Today, we’re featuring a delicious, nutrient-dense beet dip that makes a perfect addition to your Super Bowl spread.

Beet & Baobab Dip (vegan and gluten free)

2 roasted beets
¼ cup of tahini
¼ cup of chickpeas
2 tablespoons of baobab powder
2 cloves of roasted garlic
salt to taste
two oranges orange
zest of one orange
1 tablespoon of cilantro
juice of two lemons

Combine all ingredients in a food processor and blend well. Serve with chips and or veggies.

 


minimize(-)leave a comment >>

Baobab energy bites

Baobab Energy Snack Bites Holiday travels, shopping trips, parties. It's a lot and it's A LOT... Keep these tasty bit-sized bundles of goodness close by to ward off the "Hangry" as you move through this holiday season.     Ingredients: - 4 dates - 1/2 cup raw cashews - a pinch of sea salt - 1 tablespoon cacao nibs - 2 tablespoons of Bumbleroot org

read more >

IMG_5810 - Version 2

Baobab Energy Snack Bites

Holiday travels, shopping trips, parties. It’s a lot and it’s A LOT…

Keep these tasty bit-sized bundles of goodness close by to ward off the “Hangry” as you move through this holiday season.

 

 

Ingredients:

– 4 dates

– 1/2 cup raw cashews

– a pinch of sea salt

– 1 tablespoon cacao nibs

– 2 tablespoons of Bumbleroot organic Baobab powder

– 2 tablespoons of flax seeds

– 1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Preparation:

– Soak dates for 30 minutes.

– Grind cashews in a food processor.

– Add dates and other ingredients to food processor and pulse.

– Make small balls.

Find your Baobab powder HERE.

 


minimize(-)leave a comment >>

Baobab Citrus Vitamin C-packed Smoothie

Fighting off a cold weather cold? We love this easy-peasy Vitamin C-packed smoothie when we're battling the sniffles. Just one serving of Baobab contains 25% of your daily recommended value of Vitamin C.  We like to amplify the Baobab with a medley of citrus in this nourishing smoothie. Ingredients: - 1 1/2 to 2 cups of water (and some ice) -  2 oranges or 3-4 mandarins - 1/2 pears - 3 tablespoons of Baobab powder -  Juice of 1/2 lemon Blend well and enjoy! Find your Baobab powder HERE.  

read more >

Fighting off a cold weather cold? We love this easy-peasy Vitamin C-packed smoothie when we’re battling the sniffles.

Just one serving of Baobab contains 25% of your daily recommended value of Vitamin C.  We like to amplify the Baobab with a medley of citrus in this nourishing smoothie.

Ingredients:

– 1 1/2 to 2 cups of water (and some ice)

–  2 oranges or 3-4 mandarins

– 1/2 pears

– 3 tablespoons of Baobab powder

–  Juice of 1/2 lemon

Blend well and enjoy!

Find your Baobab powder HERE.

 


minimize(-)leave a comment >>

Rose Petal Honey

We love foods wild foods, and one of our very favorite wild foods is honey. Our friend, Becca, The Dabblist, shows us how we can enhance this sweet treat with roses. This is such a cozy activity for a Fall afternoon. Enjoy! From Becca: I like to add rose petals into my food and body care as much as possible. In addition to wooing you with their intoxicating scent, rose petals help to soothe and cleanse the skin and are known to support your internal digestion and liver with a boost of vitamin C and other vital nutrients. And then, there’s honey – a beautiful, delici

read more >

Rose Petal Honey

We love foods wild foods, and one of our very favorite wild foods is honey. Our friend, Becca, The Dabblist, shows us how we can enhance this sweet treat with roses. This is such a cozy activity for a Fall afternoon. Enjoy!

From Becca:

I like to add rose petals into my food and body care as much as possible. In addition to wooing you with their intoxicating scent, rose petals help to soothe and cleanse the skin and are known to support your internal digestion and liver with a boost of vitamin C and other vital nutrients.

And then, there’s honey – a beautiful, deliciously sweet gift from our beloved bees. Raw honey contains powerful healing enzymes, enhances absorption of nutrients in the body, and is super antioxidant.

This simple combination of rose petals and honey will add beauty and delight to your home. I like to add my rose honey to tea, drizzle over roast vegetables, and add it to salad dressing recipes.

A note about the quality of both your roses and your honey:

While they are both readily available at your local grocery store, it is super important (both for your body and the future of their species) to grab the purest version you can.

For roses, this means unsprayed (from the garden or a trusted source) and for honey, this means raw (unpasteurized) and local, if possible.

Rose Petal Honey

*1 glass jar of desired size (make sure it’s clean!)
*2 tbsp dried or fresh rose petals
*Enough raw, local honey to fill your jar

Add rose petals to the jar, then pour the honey over the roses filling to the top. Using a wood spoon or a chopstick, stir to mix them together, and seal tight. Let sit for 2-4 weeks {to allow ingredients to infuse}, then it’s ready for use.

***

Becca Piastrelli is the woman behind The Dabblist, and she believes in the practice of working with your hands.  Because, when we honor that primal desire to take raw ingredients and turn them into something beautiful, we experience a greater connection and engagement with ourselves and the world around us. You can often find her in her kitchen, crafting her own beauty and skincare products – everything from deodorant to lip balm.

 


minimize(-)leave a comment >>

5 Ways Not to Skip a Workout

There is something about moving our bodies that brings us back to ourselves. And at the same time that movement helps us expand our view of ourselves and of the world. Most of us know how important it is to get out there and move, but sometimes it can be difficult to make that first step.  On the Bumbleroot blog, our friend, Stephanie Burg, a former professional ballet dancer, shares her tips for making exercise a more consistent part of our lives. - Sara Afte

read more >

There is something about moving our bodies that brings us back to ourselves. And at the same time that movement helps us expand our view of ourselves and of the world. Most of us know how important it is to get out there and move, but sometimes it can be difficult to make that first step. 

On the Bumbleroot blog, our friend, Stephanie Burg, a former professional ballet dancer, shares her tips for making exercise a more consistent part of our lives.

– Sara

Stephanie head shot

After years of maintaining a rigid, intense physical activity routine in my career as a professional ballerina–hello, 700 ab exercises + 8-10 hours of dancing daily–I know a thing or two about body movement.  Granted, while I was dancing, I tended to get a little extreme with how hard I pushed myself, but my career was my passion, my driving force in life.  

Now, as a Board Certified Nutrition and Lifestyle Coach, I often hear my clients say that incorporating exercise into their daily schedules is one of the most difficult areas on their wellness journey.  Not only does it seem like there aren’t enough hours in the day to accomplish all they desire, but many of my clients note that, truth be told, they don’t always enjoy exercise very much because it feels like just another thing ‘to-do’.

As human beings our bodies are designed to move, yet we don’t have activity built into our days the way we used to.   We no longer have to hunt and gather for our food and we have amazing technology to make our lives easier.  But a lack of movement is scientifically linked to higher rates of depression, anxiety and lower self-confidence, not to mention weight gain and disease.  Rationally, it makes perfect sense for us to move each day, but somehow that’s not enough.  Some of us still have trouble making it happen with all we are responsible for in a given day.  

Daily movement is important not just so you look great in your skinny jeans–although that’s great– but to help you show up more fully in your life.

If you’re finding it difficult to prioritize daily movement, a simple task to try is to not worry about how you can squeeze movement into your day (i.e. as just another item to check off your to-do list), but how to make the movement you choose, the most enjoyable experience you possibly can, so you look forward to it and are more likely to make it happen consistently.

Here are five things that help me and my clients stay motivated to get moving:

1. A great playlist. Music helps to positively distract you from your efforts (read: pain and exertion), while a good beat can help you to push harder based on the tempo you choose.  Most importantly, movement helps to elevate your mood.  

2. Nature.  Connecting to fresh air and the world around us is so much more enjoyable than slogging away indoors.  Oxygen works wonders for metabolism and time seems to go by much quicker when we aren’t staring at a timer on the treadmill.

3. Switching it up.  By choosing activities that require all of your senses, you help to keep yourself engaged in the process.  Try to find different types of movement to do throughout the week to avoid boredom and moving on autopilot.

4. Make it FUN.  Enough said.  Make sure you actually enjoy it!  This is so important.  If you’re time is limited as it is, or you’re resistant to moving regularly, you’ve got to find something that is pleasurable for you and suits your unique body. Period.

5. Reward yourself afterward.  Give yourself something to look forward to by scheduling a fun, restorative or nourishing activity afterward. This allows you to celebrate your efforts and can help you stay consistent if built into part of your movement routine.

The more physically active we are, the sharper our minds, better our digestion, and more fluid our posture. These five tools are easy ways to stay inspired by your body, utilizing movement as the key. When used regularly, I’ve seen these steps transform people who “hate exercise” into body movement enthusiasts, practicing regularly.  

I’d love to hear from you.  What are your favorite ways to stay active? Drop me a line at stephanie@stephanieburgcoaching.com.

Have an amazing week filled with empowered choices and vibrant energy.  Here’s to supporting your amazing body-home, one workout at a time.

I invite you to love the body you call home,
Stephanie

P.s.  What works for one person, might not work for another.  This applies to the food we eat, the clothes we wear, the music we love, the scents that appeal to us, the people we’re attracted to, and so on.  Part of our journey in this lifetime is uncovering what actually works for us and no one else. If you’d like a few tools to help you figure out what type of movement works best for your unique body, click HERE for some easy ways to figure it out.

BIO:

Stephanie Burg was a professional ballerina for over a decade.  After years of restrictive, disordered eating and utter disregard for her body, a series of injuries took her from the stage and forced her to reevaluate every facet of her life, starting with her relationship to her body.

Now a Board Certified Nutrition & Lifestyle Coach, Stephanie is a fierce advocate for the human form, teaching women to return to the innate wisdom and brilliance of their female bodies by shedding outmoded, limiting beliefs and prioritizing excellent nutrition and self-care. Stephanie believes that when a woman loves the body she calls home, she embraces her power to create the life she was born to live

Stephanie’s work has been featured in publications such as ABC News, Colorado Public Radio, Dance Magazine, Mind Body Green, Elephant Journal, Tiny Buddha, and various national and local publications.  Stephanie was selected as one of Charleston, SC’s “50 Most Progressive” celebrating the most forward-thinking individuals having an impact on the future of Charleston.


minimize(-)leave a comment >>

The Global Table – Sadza

We’re excited to introduce our new blog The Global Table, sharing stories of what and how we eat around the world. Check back here every two weeks for a new dish, a new story, and a new perspective on the world. In many village homes in Zimbabwe and neighboring countries, sadza and the night’s side dish of beans, greens, or chicken stew (if it’s a really special day!) sit over a fire in front of the house in two communal bowls. The village women spend much of the day working to prepare sadza with just the right texture, best described

read more >

We’re excited to introduce our new blog The Global Table, sharing stories of what and how we eat around the world. Check back here every two weeks for a new dish, a new story, and a new perspective on the world.

33620_735507734497_1351254_n
In many village homes in Zimbabwe and neighboring countries, sadza and the night’s side dish of beans, greens, or chicken stew (if it’s a really special day!) sit over a fire in front of the house in two communal bowls. The village women spend much of the day working to prepare sadza with just the right texture, best described as a thick porridge bordering on dough. Balance is critical: the sadza can’t be too mushy or too thick. When it’s ready, the family and others gather around the fire to scoop some of the sadza between their fingers, using it to grab bites of the other tasty dishes. It’s truly finger food!

Making sadza is a long and labor intensive artform. Beginning with corn still on the cob, the kernels must be removed and ground into cornmeal. In the modern day, much of this work is done in mills, either directly for farmers who grow their own crop or for sale in retail outlets. This flour-like substance is mixed with cold water to form the sadza’s base, which is then added to boiling water and mixed with more cornmeal to achieve the desired consistency, all the while being stirred and kneaded to rid the mix of lumps, a process that demands attention, time, and lots of practice!

Sadza is served with any number of other foods, from red meat and game to native spring greens and cabbage. A thinner version of sadza is eaten for breakfast, often paired with peanut butter to provide a protein complement to the important carbohydrates inherent in the sadza itself.

In addition to being one of the most important meals on the African continent, sadza provides a miniature history lesson about the region. Today most sadza is cornmeal based, although it can also be made with native cereal grains like finger millet or sorghum, as it was for centuries before European settlers arrived. Corn, or maize as it is known in Africa, is actually not native to the continent; it wasn’t even widely grown in Africa until the late 1800s when British colonials began migrating to the area and brought corn with them. The dish represents the blending of influences on the continent. Today, corn is a staple in Africa, especially favored for its ability to grow during drier periods.

For as large a swath of land as it covers, sadza is known by an equally large collection of names: originally derived from the Shona language (native to Zimbabwe), sadza is also know by “isitshwala” in Southern Ndebele (spoken in the Transvaal region), “pap,” “vuswa,” or “bogobe” in South Africa, “nsima” in Malawi, and “ugali” in Eastern Africa. Wherever you go in Southern and Eastern Africa, some version of sadza is sure to be cooking over the fire!

If you’d like to try to make sadza at home, try this recipe that uses Sorghum from the website Pepper and Stew:

Here is what you will need to make this dish:

About 400g ground sorghum

1.5l water

2 tbsp oil

1 large chopped onion

2 ripe chopped tomatoes

3 tbsp peanut butter

250g Spinach

Salt and pepper


Sadza

First take 150g of the sorghum meal and in a medium sized sauce pan, mix with about 150ml of the cold water to make a paste using a wooden spoon.

Add a litre of the boiling water to the paste. Put on the hob on medium heat and stir continuously until the mixture starts to thicken. If it’s too thick add a bit more of the hot water.

The mixture should look like porridge and if it’s the correct consistency should boil without spilling over. (If it’s still watery and spilling over then add a little more sorghum in a cup, about a 1/4 cup, add cold water to create a paste then stir this mixture to the pot, the mixture should start to thicken after stirring continuously)

Cover and leave to cook for about 15 minutes.

After 15 minutes lower the heat and leave covered for another 5 minutes.

Stir in the remaining sorghum flour  gradually taking great care not to get burnt by the spatter.

Keep mixing briskly and to get rid of the lumps grind the mixture against the pot with the wooden spoon, the consistency of the sadza should be the same as mashed potatoes.

Leave on very low heat for another 15 minutes to cook through.


Peanut butter spinach

Heat oil in a pan and add the onions and fry until soft.

Add the chopped tomatoes , season with salt and pepper and cook until soft.

Now add the peanut butter and a little water and stir until the penut butter is mixed in.

Add the spinach and cook for another 10 minutes.

Check for seasoning and serve with hot sadza.

(To give this dish a twist you can add a little birds eye chilli and or bell peppers)

Enjoy!

 


minimize(-)leave a comment >>

Bumbleroot as a verb

to Bumbleroot (v): to go outside and explore with no goal in mind; to engage in an activity with only the intention of fun and play Last week, I was visiting one of Bumbleroot’s chefs, Matt, in Singapore. Matt is a phenomenal triathlete/Ironman and is on a cycling team that includes pro cyclists. The team hydrates with Bumbleroot and he told me that somehow they had taken to using Bumbleroot as a verb that described when someone would go out to ride just for fun, or the love of it. As in “I went Bumblerooting this afternoon…took the bike out just for fun and explored some new routes.” I LOVE that this the Bumbleroot name is bein

read more >

IMG_4687

to Bumbleroot (v): to go outside and explore with no goal in mind; to engage in an activity with only the intention of fun and play

Last week, I was visiting one of Bumbleroot’s chefs, Matt, in Singapore. Matt is a phenomenal triathlete/Ironman and is on a cycling team that includes pro cyclists. The team hydrates with Bumbleroot and he told me that somehow they had taken to using Bumbleroot as a verb that described when someone would go out to ride just for fun, or the love of it. As in “I went Bumblerooting this afternoon…took the bike out just for fun and explored some new routes.”

I LOVE that this the Bumbleroot name is being used in this way.

I realized earlier this year that I needed more “Bumblerooting” in my life. I was working way too much and was losing sight of why I was working in the first place. I wasn’t having much fun and I’m sure I wasn’t very fun to be around.

I decided to incorporate a day of play each week. It took me a month to actually do this…I kept putting it off. But then I did it…I woke up early on a Sunday morning and left San Francisco, driving north. I wasn’t sure where I was going.

I ended up at the Point Reyes national seashore. And found a gorgeous beach that I had all to myself (except for a drone flying overhead). I later (through Facebook – it’s such a small world!) saw this photo that the drone took that day and love having it as a reminder of the day I spent exploring somewhere new.

10930104_10103706763592849_1099013171440275242_n-2

 

Photo credit: Adam Mosseri

After spending time at the beach, I went into the cute town of Point Reyes and spent an hour in a bookstore and enjoyed a long lunch outside.

To be honest, the day wasn’t always comfortable…it had been so long since I had “played” or explored that I wasn’t sure how to do it. But I stuck to it and did another day of play the next week. And the next week, it expanded to a weekend of play…I’m starting to get used to play, really used to it. And the more “Bumblerooting” I do…the more work I’m getting done (without it feeling like work), the more creative I feel, and magical things keep happening.

I’m becoming a passionate advocate for “Bumblerooting”!

We’d love to hear how you go Bumblerooting. Hashtag your #bumblerooting adventures Instagram and we’ll pick our favorites to repost. Once a month, we’ll pick one of our #bumblerooting adventurers to receive a free box of Bumbleroot.

Wishing you lots of Bumblerooting!

Sara

 

 

 


minimize(-)leave a comment >>

The African Philosophy that has the Power to Change Lives

In Southern Africa, there is a beautiful concept called Ubuntu…. It has been translated as “I am, because you are,” “I am; because of you,” or “I am what I am because of who we all are.” Ubuntu represents the interconnectedness of humans and the communities in which we live and thrive.  We are who we are because of other people.  Embracing Ubuntu means we acknowledge being part of a greater whole. At Bumbleroot, this concept is at the core of our mission. Our ingredients are expertly sourced by harvesters and farmers around the world who a

read more >

BRF-140219-Ubuntu-FB-2

In Southern Africa, there is a beautiful concept called Ubuntu….

It has been translated as “I am, because you are,” “I am; because of you,” or “I am what I am because of who we all are.”

Ubuntu represents the interconnectedness of humans and the communities in which we live and thrive.  We are who we are because of other people.  Embracing Ubuntu means we acknowledge being part of a greater whole.

At Bumbleroot, this concept is at the core of our mission.

Our ingredients are expertly sourced by harvesters and farmers around the world who are committed to sustainable practices that will leave the world a better place for all of us

We are committed to paying these harvesters and farmers a fair wage so that they can support their families and contribute to their communities

We reinvest a portion of our revenues into our supplying communities to strengthen their communities and our supply chain, and

Our products are nutritious and made from real, pronounceable ingredients – helping you live your best life so that you can help others live their best lives.

What does Ubuntu mean to you?

To learn more:

Watch this TEDTalk by South African Safari guide Boyd Varty to learn more about Ubuntu and his memories of Nelson Mandela who embodied the concept and gave us the power to recognize and understand that each of us is responsible for the well being of ourselves and of others.

http://new.ted.com/talks/boyd_varty_what_i_learned_from_nelson_mandela

About Bumbleroot:

Bumbleroot creates healthy and delicious beverages and snacks that include unique, sustainably-sourced superfood ingredients from around the world.  Our first product is a Coconut Water and Baobab Drink Mix that provides everyday hydration, antioxidants, and nutrients in a convenient pocket-sized pouch.  Learn more about us at: bumblerootfoods.com

Baobab is an African superfruit with more antioxidants than acai or goji berries.  It’s also a source of Vitamin C, magnesium, and potassium and is one of the most alkaline foods available.


minimize(-)leave a comment >>

Baobab Banana Cacao Smoothie Recipe

  One of my favorite ways to use Baobab powder is in this smoothie.  I eat it for breakfast a few times a week and love to have it after workouts too.  Either way, it gives me an energy boost and it tastes like dessert. Baobab is one the most alkaline foods available (PRAL rating of -52), and is high in antioxidants, vitamin, C, and dietary fiber.  It also is a source of magnesium, potassium, and loads of other great things. - 1 cup of almond milk - 1 banana - 1 tablespoon of Baobab powder - 1 tablespoon of peanut butter or almond butter (I love Justin's Honey Pea

read more >

Baobab Banana Cacao Smoothie Recipe

 

One of my favorite ways to use Baobab powder is in this smoothie.  I eat it for breakfast a few times a week and love to have it after workouts too.  Either way, it gives me an energy boost and it tastes like dessert.

Baobab is one the most alkaline foods available (PRAL rating of -52), and is high in antioxidants, vitamin, C, and dietary fiber.  It also is a source of magnesium, potassium, and loads of other great things.

– 1 cup of almond milk

– 1 banana

– 1 tablespoon of Baobab powder

– 1 tablespoon of peanut butter or almond butter (I love Justin’s Honey Peanut Butter)

– 1/2 teaspoon cacao powder

Blend in blender and sprinkle with a few cacao nibs.  Enjoy!

You can get baobab powder in our online shop.

– Sara


minimize(-)leave a comment >>

Eat Well and Do Good – An African superfood gift pack featuring Baobab and Moringa from Bumbleroot and Kuli Kuli.

To help someone in need, what do you do? Often, we think we must give oodles of money or time to help those in need. But where does that money go? How can you afford that time? Concerns like these can make issues of poverty and malnutrition seem insurmountable, and so often we end up doing nothing at all… Here’s a solution. Don’t sweat saving the world in one fell swoop. Instead, contribute to a bigger cause by buying products that responsibly lift up those in need. Con

read more >

BRF-131127-GiftPack_fb_R3

To help someone in need, what do you do?

Often, we think we must give oodles of money or time to help those in need. But where does that money go? How can you afford that time? Concerns like these can make issues of poverty and malnutrition seem insurmountable, and so often we end up doing nothing at all…

Here’s a solution.

Don’t sweat saving the world in one fell swoop. Instead, contribute to a bigger cause by buying products that responsibly lift up those in need. Conscientious health food companies Bumbleroot and Kuli Kuli have teamed up to let you do just that. This holiday season, take advantage of our nutrient-packed gift pack featuring Bumbleboot Baobab Drink Mixes and Kuli Kuli Superfood Bars with Moringa. These superfood products will help your body, while our companies’ business models help those in need.

Purchases increase incomes in Africa.

Nutrient-packed superfoods Baobab and Moringa are purchased from low-income communities in Africa committed to sustainable farming and harvesting practices. Your purchase helps increase their income and also encourages these men and women to incorporate these superfoods into their own diets, helping to combat the malnutrition that is rife in their communities. Learn more here.

Helping those in need has never been so easy. Or healthy.

The Eat Well and Do Good gift pack is available for a limited time this holiday season. Click here to help those in need by getting your healthy drinks and snacks.

Baobab

IMG_0412

The baobab fruit comes from the Baobab tree – a gnarly tree that looks like it’s been torn out of the ground and turned upside down. Also known as the “tree of life”, it’s often grown in the most drought prone and poorest areas in Africa.

IMG_0015

The fruit pulp is in powder-form when the fruit is opened.  The pulp contains 10x more antioxidants than acai or goji berry and is a source of vitamin C, dietary fiber, potassium, and magnesium.

Moringa

moringa-oleifera

Moringa au marchÇ (7)

The tiny leaves of the Moringa oleifera tree may be the world’s most nutritious green with high levels of protein, calcium, iron, Vitamin C and Vitamin A. Once eaten by the ancient Romans, Greeks and Egyptians, moringa leaves have been used in traditional medicine passed down for centuries in many cultures. More recently, the modern scientific community has begun to validate many of these claims with over 1300 studies, articles and publications on moringa. Kuli Kuli is the first company to retail ready-to-eat moringa products.

Bumbleroot

Bumbleroot creates tasty, healthy beverage food products from unique, organic, sustainably-sourced ingredients.  Bumbleroot creates markets for these ingredients – getting them into the hands of health-conscious consumers – while providing income to low-income communities throughout the world and encouraging sustainable agriculture

Bumbleroot’s first product line is a single serving powdered drink mix featuring organic fair trade coconut water, organic baobab, and real fruit and herb powders for flavoring. The superfood-filled drink mix delights the taste buds and is easy to take on the go for all sorts of play – traveling, cycling, hiking, yoga, etc.

Bumbleroot was born when founder Sara Andrews came across the baobab fruit while living and volunteering in Zimbabwe with the NGO TechnoServe.  Baobab is grown in drought-prone areas that often have few income opportunities.  Creating a market for baobab creates income opportunities for the people who live in the areas where the baobab tree grows.

Kuli Kuli

Kuli Kuli is the first company to introduce moringa, a unique superfood, to the U.S. market in the form of a food product. Our first moringa product is a gluten-free nutrition bar full of simple, wholesome ingredients and a nutritious burst of moringa. We form women-owned farming cooperatives in West Africa to grow moringa and use it to improve the health of their communities. By incentivizing women to use moringa and paying fair trade wages, Kuli Kuli is improving livelihoods and health.

“As a Peace Corps Volunteer in Niger, I saw first-hand the impact that moringa can have on improving nutrition. I came up with the idea to support women’s cooperatives to grow more moringa to nourish their communities and earn a livelihood by selling a portion of their harvests in the United States in the form of delicious Kuli Kuli Bars,” said Lisa Curtis, Kuli Kuli’s Founder and CEO.

Kuli Kuli Bars are gluten-free, vegan and made with just a few simple all-natural ingredients. They are low in calories but contain high amounts of fiber, protein and vitamins. Kuli Kuli has tested their bars at farmer’s markets in Oakland to resounding success.

Follow Bumbleroot and Sara Andrews on Twitter: @bumblerootfoods @sara_g_andrews

Follow Kuli Kuli and Lisa Curtis on Twitter: @kulikulibar @lisacurtis

Follow Bumbleroot on Facebook

Follow Kuli Kuli on Facebook

www.bumblerootfoods.com

www.kulikulibar.com



minimize(-)leave a comment >>

Recipe – Baobab Cacao Mousse

Baobab – the African superfruit – is super alkaline,  packed with antioxidants, is a source of Vitamin C and dietary fiber, and acts as a prebiotic.  The tangy sweet powder that comes from the fruit pairs great with desserts, and chocolate specifically.  This dairy-free, raw, superfood-filled mousse is creamy and rich with a hint of citrus.  Best of all it takes only a few minutes to make. Perfect for holiday parties or parties of two. 2 avocados 3 tablespoons of cacao powder 2 tablespoons of honey (you can also substitute agave syrup or dates)

read more >

baobabcacaomousse3

Baobab – the African superfruit – is super alkaline,  packed with antioxidants, is a source of Vitamin C and dietary fiber, and acts as a prebiotic.  The tangy sweet powder that comes from the fruit pairs great with desserts, and chocolate specifically.  This dairy-free, raw, superfood-filled mousse is creamy and rich with a hint of citrus.  Best of all it takes only a few minutes to make.

Perfect for holiday parties or parties of two.

2 avocados

3 tablespoons of cacao powder

2 tablespoons of honey (you can also substitute agave syrup or dates)

1 teaspoon of baobab pulp

Sprinkling of coconut chips (optional)

A little crystallized ginger (optional)

You can dress up the mousse with some coconut chips and crystallized ginger.

Combine all the ingredients and blend in blender or food processor.
Serves 2

You can get organic baobab pulp here.

 

 

 

 


minimize(-)leave a comment >>

Can Superfoods Help Solve Malnutrition?

Throughout Africa, there are pockets of areas that are habitually drought-prone.  With little access to water or income opportunities, malnourishment is a serious problem.  According to Save the Children, "malnutrition is an underlying cause of death of 2.6 million children each year -- one third of the global total of children's deaths." In areas with extreme weather (drought, heat, cold), mother nature has addressed this problem by creating superfood plants.  Many superfoods come from areas where the plants have had to work extra hard to survive.  Protecting themselves from extreme weather by creating phytochemicals, these plants c

read more >

IMG_0015

Throughout Africa, there are pockets of areas that are habitually drought-prone.  With little access to water or income opportunities, malnourishment is a serious problem.  According to Save the Children, “malnutrition is an underlying cause of death of 2.6 million children each year — one third of the global total of children’s deaths.”

In areas with extreme weather (drought, heat, cold), mother nature has addressed this problem by creating superfood plants.  Many superfoods come from areas where the plants have had to work extra hard to survive.  Protecting themselves from extreme weather by creating phytochemicals, these plants can provide much-needed nutritional benefits to the people who live in the areas where they grow.

Baobab is a tree that grows in Africa’s most arid regions.  The superfruit from the tree contains all essential amino acides, antioxidants, dietary fiber, calcium, vitamin C, potassium, and magnesium.

Unfortunately, baobab and other local foods, with are jam-packed with antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals are often shunned for being too “traditional” or as foods that are for “poor” people.  Even when in scarce supply, food can be a status symbol, and eating purchased maize (corn) mean instead of free and readily available baobab, indicates a level of upward mobility that is a sense of pride.

Luckily, in some areas, there is a shift in this thinking and it’s starting at Whole Foods and your local organic food stores.  The demand for superfoods from the United States, Europe, and Asia is giving these foods value in the communities from which they are harvested.  Now that there is a dollar amount associated with baobab, it’s slowing shifting from a “poor” person food to a viable food options (and a highly nutritious one!).

Gus Le Breton, CEO of Bio-Innovation Zimbabwe, explains this shift, along with the economic opportunities that Baobab provides in the video below:

Gus le Breton on Baobab, economic opportunity, and nutrition

 


minimize(-)leave a comment >>

Welcome to the Bumbleroot blog!

At Bumbleroot, we've been building a product we love. It's a beverage brimming with energizing electrolytes courtesy of coconut water, just one of its delicious and nutritious ingredients. Better yet, our new drink boasts baobab fruit, the African superfood that’s jam-packed with oodles of great things like antioxidants, vitamin C, potassium, calcium, and magnesium. And that means our drinks are, too.

We’re excited that our drinks are so delicious. We’re even more excited that they’re good for you and Mother Earth, too. Did you know that two million plastic bottles are dis

read more >

BumbleRoot PackagingAt Bumbleroot, we’ve been building a product we love. It’s a beverage brimming with energizing electrolytes courtesy of coconut water, just one of its delicious and nutritious ingredients. Better yet, our new drink boasts baobab fruit, the African superfood that’s jam-packed with oodles of great things like antioxidants, vitamin C, potassium, calcium, and magnesium. And that means our drinks are, too.

We’re excited that our drinks are so delicious. We’re even more excited that they’re good for you and Mother Earth, too. Did you know that two million plastic bottles are discarded every five minutes in the United States alone? We didn’t either. But when we saw this gut-wrenching statistic, we vowed our product would not to be part of the problem. Instead of plastic bottles, our brilliant beverages are in powder form so that the packaging is as minimal as possible. The pocket-sized packaging means it’s also easy to keep on hand — or in pocket, purse, backpack, briefcase, diaper bag, sports bag, sports bra, passport cover… You get the idea.

But at Bumbleroot we’ve been building more than products — we’ve been building a company we love, too. A company that represents the things we care about: top-notch nutrition, sustainable agriculture, fair prices for farmers, and, of course, scrumptious snacks.

Each day we ask ourselves: Is there a better way to do the things we do? Is there a more nutritious ingredient? Is there packaging available that’s even better for the environment? Are our suppliers being paid fairly?

We’ve been chewing over these questions, and in so doing we’ve realized that there’s a lot of improvements to be made in the way food products are made and food companies are run. We’re not perfect, but we’re working hard to get close. Our goal is to create a company that we can be proud of so that you can, too.

As we continue foraging our path, Bumbleroot wants to include you, our customers, in this dialogue. And that’s what this blog is for. It’s meant to be a way in which to seed, sprout, cultivate, and grow awesome ideas. We’ll be hearing from experts on agricultural development, packaging, the environment, nutrition, and many other issues that influence this business. And we’ll be sharing stories about Bumbleroot’s ingredients, as well as the men and women who grow and harvest these unique foods.

So pull up a chair and join the discussion!

-Sara


minimize(-)leave a comment >>