Bumbleroot’s Story

Whether you've been part of the Bumbleroot community for awhile or are brand new, we are so glad you're here. We hope you love our products, and today we also wanted to share our storyand why we do what we do. From our Founder, Sara: Seven years ago, I left a corporate job in Chicago to move to Zimbabwe. Years before, I had been a policy advisor to a U.S. Senator on agriculture issues, and I knew that: 

  • 1/2 of the world lives on $2.50 a day or less. 
  • The majority of those people engage in small scale agriculture. 
  • Conventional farming methods (utilizing expensive synthetic fertilizer and pesticides) were being promoted to these farmers in developing countries.
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Whether you’ve been part of the Bumbleroot community for awhile or are brand new, we are so glad you’re here.

We hope you love our products, and today we also wanted to share our storyand why we do what we do.

From our Founder, Sara:

Seven years ago, I left a corporate job in Chicago to move to Zimbabwe. Years before, I had been a policy advisor to a U.S. Senator on agriculture issues, and I knew that: 

  • 1/2 of the world lives on $2.50 a day or less. 
  • The majority of those people engage in small scale agriculture. 
  • Conventional farming methods (utilizing expensive synthetic fertilizer and pesticides) were being promoted to these farmers in developing countries.
  • Agriculture had the potential to impact climate change (both negatively and positively – in a big way).

But I also knew there was only so much I could learn from reading. I wanted to be on the ground, and meet these farmers and see for myself how agriculture could be used as a force for good: for higher incomes, for better nutrition, for better soil and water. 

The pull to Africa grew stronger and stronger, and in 2010, I found myself on a plane heading to a country I’d never been to, where I didn’t know another person. I remember thinking while I was on the plane that this was either the best or worst decision of my life. 

I arrived shortly after the country begun to use the U.S. dollar as currency after a run of trillion percent inflation.  There was so little currency circulating, that the dollars that were being used were used over and over and looked like they had been thrown in the mud, crinkled up, and then air-dried. After handling the cash, it was imperative to wash your hands.

Just a few years earlier, the country had been the “bread basket of Africa” – producing and exporting the food that was consumed throughout Africa and Europe. Land reform and redistribution (too long to cover here, but in short – it was violent and poorly executed), had left the most productive land unused (and disputed), while small farmers were working to try to feed themselves on less than prime land (and usually on just a few acres) and in the midst of a recovering economy.


The agriculture industry and NGOs in the country were working together to figure out a way to bring these small farmers into the food value chain. It was in the interest of everyone – food processors needed ingredients to produce food products, farmers needed income, seed producers needed to sell seeds, etc. 

I was working with the agriculture industry through an NGO and we all had the best of intentions and wanted these small farmers to be able to grow more food. Prevalent thinking was that the best way for farmers to grow more food was to use certain seeds, use a certain amount of fertilizer, and a certain amount of fertilizer and voila – in a season there would be corn, wheat, or soy. 

While we were working out the difficult puzzle of how small farmers could afford seeds, fertilizers, and pesticides when only farming a few acres, I was coming across amazing wild harvested foods in the rural areas. The King (or Queen) of these wild foods, was the Baobab fruit. Growing on majestic and gnarly trees that were hundreds to thousands of year old, these fruits had been traditionally used as food, drink, and medicine in the villages. 

Recent studies showed that the fruit had more antioxidants than acai or goji berries, was high in Vitamin C, and was a great source of dietary fiber. When the fruit was ripe, it fell to the ground. It cost nothing to pick up and harvest. Because it was readily available, it had at some point become considered “poor people food” and had a stigma attached to it. While children readily ate the candy-like fruit, adults shunned it. 

But what if the baobab fruit could be harvested and made into products? Local harvesters could receive income with no investment; the ancient trees would have economic value, further protecting them from being cut down (for example – for a powerline for a mine – this happened); and more people could benefit from the fantastic nutritional profile of the fruit.

The only thing missing in the equation was connecting the baobab fruit and consumers. I ended up moving back to the U.S. and founded Bumbleroot to do just that. But I had never created a food product before. I knew I wanted it to be healthy. I knew I wanted the packaging to be as low-impact to the environment as possible, and I wanted to make sure we were supporting our sourcing communities.

It’s been a long journey, but this is what we’ve learned:

  • We can create products that are not only healthy, but are nutritionally dense and easy to incorporate into our everyday lives. 
  • We can celebrate and feature unique ingredients that promote biodiversity in our food supply chain and protect these plants going forward (did you know the world has lost 94% of its seed diversity in the last century). 
  • We can find and use ingredients that meet our level of integrity – in their most natural state possible, sustainably farmed or harvested, enhancing soil rather than degrading it, and providing a fair price to the people who grow or harvest the food.
  • We can use packaging that is less impactful for the environment and less wasteful. Our drink packets aren’t biodegradeable (yet), but produce less waste than the 80% of bottles that are thrown away. 
  • We can support our harvesters and farmers. In addition to paying fair prices, we are reinvesting a percentage of revenue back into oursupplying communities. This past year, that money went to purchasing books for the schools (voted on by the community). The income is making a difference in peoples lives and is helping pay for school fees, clinic visits, and wells.
  • Traditional foods are making a comeback. Throughout the world, local communities are rediscovering local plants and foods and are reintegrating them back into their diets and culture. In Zimbabwe, oursupplying communities are now consuming more Baobab after realizing that others were paying a high price for it.
  • We can show the food industry that packaged food can be created in a different way – in a way that supports the environment – featuring ingredients that support soil health and reduce carbon emissions; enhances health; and reduces packaging waste.
  • And, we are also learning, that our community is craving more community and information around healthy, sustainable, and biodiverse food

To that end, we have created a Facebook group: Bumbleroot Cafe that allows for a sharing of information and conversation on healthy food, sustainable supply chains, growing our own food, and unique recipes and stories that celebrate culture and geography. Join here. 

We have more products to come and more stories to share. Thank you for being a part of our journey.

Sara


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Baobab Hydrating Face Mask

Barbara, a dear Bumbleroot friend, recently crafted a nourishing Baobab face mask to refresh and clean the skin and we’re obsessed. We’re delighted to share in what we know is a great way to keep your skin well hydrated as the seasons change. And, coconut oil + baobab? One of our favorite combinations!

We hope you feel just as refreshed after taking such good care of your skin! Happy hydrating!

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Baobab Hydrating Mask Ingredients - Bowl with Coconut Oil and Baobab Powder
Barbara, a dear Bumbleroot friend, recently crafted a nourishing Baobab face mask to refresh and clean the skin and we’re obsessed. We’re delighted to share in what we know is a great way to keep your skin well hydrated as the seasons change. And, coconut oil + baobab? One of our favorite combinations!

We hope you feel just as refreshed after taking such good care of your skin!

Happy hydrating!

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp (or less) coconut oil
  • 1 tsp jojoba oil
  • 2 to 5 drops of lemongrass essential oil
  • 2 tbsp Bumbleroot Foods Baobab powder

 

Mixing baobab mask ingredients in bowlMethod

  1. Mix all ingredients together. We recommend using a small bowl or lid.
  2. Massage into skin, covering your entire face.
  3. Leave on for 10-15 minutes.
  4. Voila! Remove with a tissue.

 

Baobab Hydrating Mask with Baobab Powder Finished

 

It is not necessary to rinse off this mask – in fact, we recommend allowing your skin to absorb the remaining oil.

**As we’re sustainability mavens,  we’ve made sure the mask can be used as a moisturizer as well.**

To use as a moisturizer, lessen the ingredient amounts by half or more.

Then, apply as you would a facial oil:

  1. Apply to clean skin (a little damp is okay, and helps your skin absorb the oils).
  2. Dab on nose, chin, cheeks and forehead.
  3. Blend with gentle strokes.

This hydrating facial mask/moisturizer can be kept in an airtight jar, and stored in a cool, dry place, if you desire to mix up a batch for daily use. Coconut oil lasts well when mixed; but you may want to omit the lemongrass oil for a larger batch, and instead add it in daily.

Benefits

Coconut oil (moisturizing + antibacterial to cleanse the facial surface of bacteria)

Lemongrass (properties include anti-fungal, insecticidal, antiseptic, and anti-inflammation, and it is also, stimulating, relaxing, soothing, and balancing as an aromotherapy)

Baobab (high in vitamin C – which boosts collagen production, supporting smoother, brighter skin)
When combined, this is the miracle mixture that works to hydrate, refresh, and relax your skin!

Suitable for all skin types.

 
Baobab is a superfruit that has great things, like antioxidants,dietary fiber,vitamin C, vitamin B, calcium, magnesium, and potassium. The fruit – a big, coconut looking thing – comes from Africa’s picturesque baobab tree, known as the “Tree of Life.

One serving (about 2 tablespoons) contains 24% of your daily recommended dietary fiber and 25% of the daily recommended Vitamin C. And if that wasn’t enough, the fiber in the Baobab fruit pulp acts as a prebiotic – helping your gut grow its good bacteria so that you can better absorb nutrients. And it’s extremely alkaline with a PRAL value of -52. Its tangy and slightly sweet taste works well in smoothies, tomato sauce, desserts, and many other foods.


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The World’s Oldest Living Tree – And Its Healing Secrets

When I saw my first Baobab tree in Zimbabwe, I stood in front of it in awe. The tree gave me a “feeling”…I had never even heard of the tree, but upon first glance I knew there was something different about this tree, something very special. The first thing I noticed was its size. The tree is huge — it’s so huge that houses have been built inside the trunk. And then I noticed how different it looked — odd and beautiful at the same time…the branches are gnarly and look like roots that have been torn out of the ground. The Baobab Tree sits in the center of many villages in Afr

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Baobab harvesters under that Baobab Tree

When I saw my first Baobab tree in Zimbabwe, I stood in front of it in awe. The tree gave me a “feeling”…I had never even heard of the tree, but upon first glance I knew there was something different about this tree, something very special.

The first thing I noticed was its size. The tree is huge — it’s so huge that houses have been built inside the trunk. And then I noticed how different it looked — odd and beautiful at the same time…the branches are gnarly and look like roots that have been torn out of the ground.

The Baobab Tree sits in the center of many villages in Africa and is referred to as the “Tree of Life”. It holds deep spiritual significance to the communities that live around it. Stories of the baobab are as old as man, so it’s only fitting that the word baobab literally means “the time when man began”.

Rights of passage, spiritual ceremonies, village meetings, and shade seeking happen beneath these massive trees that are hundreds to thousands of years old, and they are so revered in their communities that many trees receive human names or become known as Um, which means mother. It is believed that the spirits of ancestors become a part of the trees and provide the nourishment that comes the water they store (a tree can store up to 30,000 gallons of water at once), their leaves, their seeds, and especially the dried pulp found in their fruit.

Child eating Baobab fruit

The fruit pulp is traditionally used medicinally to treat stomach aches, fevers, and malaria. Within the villages, it is also widely thought to cure hangovers and is used as a pain reliever for aches and pains, as well as arthritis. A UN study found that the pulp mixed with water was more effective in rehydrating children with severe diarrhea than World Health Organization remedies. It is also commonly used as a milk substitute.

Given the nutritional benefits, consumers around the world are purchasing the baobab powder, which is providing much needed income to the communities that live around Baobab trees. Harvestors sustainably harvest the fruit when it falls to the ground and the pulp is ground up to make a powder that can be added to smoothies, pancakes, and anything that would benefit from its tart and tangy taste.

Recent nutritional studies have given further insight into the fruit’s nutritional benefits which include:

More antioxidants than acai or Goji berries. It blows nearly every other superfood out of the water according to its ORAC score. Antioxidants protect our cells from damage caused by free radicals.

Nutrient-dense heavy-hitter. Baobab has potassium, Vitamin C, and is a source of Vitamin B6, magnesium, and calcium.

Immune boosting. Baobab fruit has an incredible amount of Vitamin C with 3-5 times the amount of an orange. One serving of Baobab powder (two tablespoons) has 25% of your daily recommended value of Vitamin C.

Prebiotic. A healthy gut is now recognized as being crucial to optimal health. You’ve heard of probiotics, but just as important are prebiotics which help that good bacteria grow in your gut. One serving of Baobab powder also has 24% of your daily recommended dietary fiber which aids in digestion.

Fiber-heavy. Baobab fruit is almost 50% fiber, half of which is soluble. Soluble fiber can help control blood glucose levels, improve blood cholesterol levels and heart health, help you feel fuller for longer, reduce visceral fat and slow down digestion. Soluble fiber could also help decrease the likelihood of insulin resistance.

Given these nutritional benefits, consumers around the world are purchasing the baobab powder, which is providing much needed income to the communities that live around Baobab trees. Harvestors sustainably harvest the fruit when it falls to the ground and the pulp is ground up to make a powder that can be added to smoothies, pancakes, and anything that would benefit from its tart and tangy taste.

Baobab fruit opened

Harvesters, who are mostly women, are using the income to pay for school fees, to buy wells, and to generally improve their quality of life.

And now that the trees also have an economic value in addition to the spiritual and nutritional value in the communities, they are being protected to an even greater extent, meaning that man (and woman) can give back to the tree that’s given so much to them.

I created Bumbleroot to get more Baobab out in the world and to provide more economic opportunities for the women (and men) who harvest the baobab. We’re committed to dreaming up and creating unique and healthy products using baobab and other wild harvested foods from around the world. Check out our baobab powder and other products at www.bumblerootfoods.com

~Sara


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5 Ways Not to Skip a Workout

There is something about moving our bodies that brings us back to ourselves. And at the same time that movement helps us expand our view of ourselves and of the world. Most of us know how important it is to get out there and move, but sometimes it can be difficult to make that first step.  On the Bumbleroot blog, our friend, Stephanie Burg, a former professional ballet dancer, shares her tips for making exercise a more consistent part of our lives. - Sara Afte

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There is something about moving our bodies that brings us back to ourselves. And at the same time that movement helps us expand our view of ourselves and of the world. Most of us know how important it is to get out there and move, but sometimes it can be difficult to make that first step. 

On the Bumbleroot blog, our friend, Stephanie Burg, a former professional ballet dancer, shares her tips for making exercise a more consistent part of our lives.

– Sara

Stephanie head shot

After years of maintaining a rigid, intense physical activity routine in my career as a professional ballerina–hello, 700 ab exercises + 8-10 hours of dancing daily–I know a thing or two about body movement.  Granted, while I was dancing, I tended to get a little extreme with how hard I pushed myself, but my career was my passion, my driving force in life.  

Now, as a Board Certified Nutrition and Lifestyle Coach, I often hear my clients say that incorporating exercise into their daily schedules is one of the most difficult areas on their wellness journey.  Not only does it seem like there aren’t enough hours in the day to accomplish all they desire, but many of my clients note that, truth be told, they don’t always enjoy exercise very much because it feels like just another thing ‘to-do’.

As human beings our bodies are designed to move, yet we don’t have activity built into our days the way we used to.   We no longer have to hunt and gather for our food and we have amazing technology to make our lives easier.  But a lack of movement is scientifically linked to higher rates of depression, anxiety and lower self-confidence, not to mention weight gain and disease.  Rationally, it makes perfect sense for us to move each day, but somehow that’s not enough.  Some of us still have trouble making it happen with all we are responsible for in a given day.  

Daily movement is important not just so you look great in your skinny jeans–although that’s great– but to help you show up more fully in your life.

If you’re finding it difficult to prioritize daily movement, a simple task to try is to not worry about how you can squeeze movement into your day (i.e. as just another item to check off your to-do list), but how to make the movement you choose, the most enjoyable experience you possibly can, so you look forward to it and are more likely to make it happen consistently.

Here are five things that help me and my clients stay motivated to get moving:

1. A great playlist. Music helps to positively distract you from your efforts (read: pain and exertion), while a good beat can help you to push harder based on the tempo you choose.  Most importantly, movement helps to elevate your mood.  

2. Nature.  Connecting to fresh air and the world around us is so much more enjoyable than slogging away indoors.  Oxygen works wonders for metabolism and time seems to go by much quicker when we aren’t staring at a timer on the treadmill.

3. Switching it up.  By choosing activities that require all of your senses, you help to keep yourself engaged in the process.  Try to find different types of movement to do throughout the week to avoid boredom and moving on autopilot.

4. Make it FUN.  Enough said.  Make sure you actually enjoy it!  This is so important.  If you’re time is limited as it is, or you’re resistant to moving regularly, you’ve got to find something that is pleasurable for you and suits your unique body. Period.

5. Reward yourself afterward.  Give yourself something to look forward to by scheduling a fun, restorative or nourishing activity afterward. This allows you to celebrate your efforts and can help you stay consistent if built into part of your movement routine.

The more physically active we are, the sharper our minds, better our digestion, and more fluid our posture. These five tools are easy ways to stay inspired by your body, utilizing movement as the key. When used regularly, I’ve seen these steps transform people who “hate exercise” into body movement enthusiasts, practicing regularly.  

I’d love to hear from you.  What are your favorite ways to stay active? Drop me a line at stephanie@stephanieburgcoaching.com.

Have an amazing week filled with empowered choices and vibrant energy.  Here’s to supporting your amazing body-home, one workout at a time.

I invite you to love the body you call home,
Stephanie

P.s.  What works for one person, might not work for another.  This applies to the food we eat, the clothes we wear, the music we love, the scents that appeal to us, the people we’re attracted to, and so on.  Part of our journey in this lifetime is uncovering what actually works for us and no one else. If you’d like a few tools to help you figure out what type of movement works best for your unique body, click HERE for some easy ways to figure it out.

BIO:

Stephanie Burg was a professional ballerina for over a decade.  After years of restrictive, disordered eating and utter disregard for her body, a series of injuries took her from the stage and forced her to reevaluate every facet of her life, starting with her relationship to her body.

Now a Board Certified Nutrition & Lifestyle Coach, Stephanie is a fierce advocate for the human form, teaching women to return to the innate wisdom and brilliance of their female bodies by shedding outmoded, limiting beliefs and prioritizing excellent nutrition and self-care. Stephanie believes that when a woman loves the body she calls home, she embraces her power to create the life she was born to live

Stephanie’s work has been featured in publications such as ABC News, Colorado Public Radio, Dance Magazine, Mind Body Green, Elephant Journal, Tiny Buddha, and various national and local publications.  Stephanie was selected as one of Charleston, SC’s “50 Most Progressive” celebrating the most forward-thinking individuals having an impact on the future of Charleston.


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10 things you didn’t know about the Baobab fruit

  1. The Baobab fruit has more antioxidants that acai or goji berries.  It blows nearly every other superfood out of the water according to its ORAC score.  This heavy hitter also has potassium, magnesium, calcium, and Vitamin C.
  2. How to pronounce Baobab. There is no agreed to pronunciation. Even in Africa where it's grown, people pronounce it differently.  The most common pronunciations are: Bow-bob, Bow-bab, Bay-o-bob, and Bay-o-bab.  Try them out and pick your favorite.
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10 things to know about baobab

  1. The Baobab fruit has more antioxidants that acai or goji berries.  It blows nearly every other superfood out of the water according to its ORAC score.  This heavy hitter also has potassium, magnesium, calcium, and Vitamin C.
  2. How to pronounce Baobab. There is no agreed to pronunciation. Even in Africa where it’s grown, people pronounce it differently.  The most common pronunciations are: Bow-bob, Bow-bab, Bay-o-bob, and Bay-o-bab.  Try them out and pick your favorite.
  3. It’s super alkaline. For our bodies to function optimally, we should make sure that we have an alkaline PH blood level.  How do we do this? By eating highly alkaline foods.  Baobab is one of the highest alkaline foods available with a a PRAL rating of -52.
  4. It’s an amazing source of dietary fiber and vitamin C.  One serving (~two tablespoons) has 25% of your daily recommended value of Vitamin C and 24% of your daily recommended dietary fiber.
  5. And…it acts as a prebiotic.  That is not a typo.  You’ve heard of probiotics, but just as important are prebiotics which help that good bacteria grow in your gut.  The fiber in the baobab fruit has prebiotic properties.
  6. The Baobab tree is one one of the most gnarly trees you have ever seen.  Also known as the “tree of life”, it looks like it’s been torn out of the ground and turned upside down.  And some of the trees are so big that they have been carved out and have bars inside of them.
  7. The tree is grown in the poorest areas of Africa.  Baobab trees grow in the driest areas in Africa, which are usually also the poorest areas.  Income opportunities are scarce and harvesting Baobab can provide the people who live in these areas the funds to improve their quality of life.
  8. It’s harvested sustainably.  When the fruit is ripe, it falls to the ground and is picked up by harvesters.  No damage is done to the tree.  In fact, certain practices that harm the tree (like shaving the bark to create rugs) are prohibited in the areas that harvest Baobab fruit for income.  So harvesting the fruit actually helps save the trees.
  9. Cyclists and other athletes love it. Whether it’s the antioxidants or the other vitamins and minerals, athletes adding Baobab to their diets are enjoying increased energy and lessened recovery times.  Ironman Matt White says.  “I used baobab in all my smoothies in training leading up to the Ironman race.  It provided sustained energy throughout the day, even after intense workout sessions.”
  10. How to eat it. The fruit comes in raw, powdered form.  It’s ready to add to smoothies, salad dressings, on oatmeal, to anything chocolate and more.  Its sweet and tangy taste pairs amazingly with honey..

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Baobab Smoothie Recipe (Dairy Free and Gluten Free)

Did you know Baobab powder has 10x more antioxidants than acai or goji berry, acts as a prebiotic, and that one serving (2T) has 24% of your daily recommended dietary fiber and 25% of your daily recommended Vitamin C? It's also a source of potassium and magnesium. So how do you add this new superfruit into your diet? Bumbleroot’s plant-based, endurance athlete Chef Matt White came up with this recipe while training for the Ironman. Matt says: This smoothie is a complete meal replacement, containing protein, essential amino acids, complex carbohydrates and almost all of the dail

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BRF-131104-Blog_smoothie

Did you know Baobab powder has 10x more antioxidants than acai or goji berry, acts as a prebiotic, and that one serving (2T) has 24% of your daily recommended dietary fiber and 25% of your daily recommended Vitamin C? It’s also a source of potassium and magnesium.

So how do you add this new superfruit into your diet?

Bumbleroot’s plant-based, endurance athlete Chef Matt White came up with this recipe while training for the Ironman.

Matt says:

This smoothie is a complete meal replacement, containing protein, essential amino acids, complex carbohydrates and almost all of the daily vitamins your body needs.

Drink it for breakfast, as a pre-workout meal or as an after workout drink.

I used Baobab in all my smoothies in training leading up to the Ironman race.  It provided sustained energy throughout the day, even after intense workout sessions.  It also provided extra vitamins and amino acids to help keep me healthy when my immune system was depleted.

INGREDIENTS

Makes two servings.

2 T Baobab Powder

3/4 cup of Almond Milk, more or  less depending on desired thickness

2 Cups of Spinach

1 Cup Pineapple, chopped

1 Apple, sliced

6-7 Brazil Nuts

1 Beet, two if small, skin removed

1/2 Haas Avocado

1/2 Cup of Blueberries

1 T Chia Seed

2 T Organic Peanut Butter

1/2 Cup of Ice

To get Baobab powder, check out our online store .


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Can Superfoods Help Solve Malnutrition?

Throughout Africa, there are pockets of areas that are habitually drought-prone.  With little access to water or income opportunities, malnourishment is a serious problem.  According to Save the Children, "malnutrition is an underlying cause of death of 2.6 million children each year -- one third of the global total of children's deaths." In areas with extreme weather (drought, heat, cold), mother nature has addressed this problem by creating superfood plants.  Many superfoods come from areas where the plants have had to work extra hard to survive.  Protecting themselves from extreme weather by creating phytochemicals, these plants c

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Throughout Africa, there are pockets of areas that are habitually drought-prone.  With little access to water or income opportunities, malnourishment is a serious problem.  According to Save the Children, “malnutrition is an underlying cause of death of 2.6 million children each year — one third of the global total of children’s deaths.”

In areas with extreme weather (drought, heat, cold), mother nature has addressed this problem by creating superfood plants.  Many superfoods come from areas where the plants have had to work extra hard to survive.  Protecting themselves from extreme weather by creating phytochemicals, these plants can provide much-needed nutritional benefits to the people who live in the areas where they grow.

Baobab is a tree that grows in Africa’s most arid regions.  The superfruit from the tree contains all essential amino acides, antioxidants, dietary fiber, calcium, vitamin C, potassium, and magnesium.

Unfortunately, baobab and other local foods, with are jam-packed with antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals are often shunned for being too “traditional” or as foods that are for “poor” people.  Even when in scarce supply, food can be a status symbol, and eating purchased maize (corn) mean instead of free and readily available baobab, indicates a level of upward mobility that is a sense of pride.

Luckily, in some areas, there is a shift in this thinking and it’s starting at Whole Foods and your local organic food stores.  The demand for superfoods from the United States, Europe, and Asia is giving these foods value in the communities from which they are harvested.  Now that there is a dollar amount associated with baobab, it’s slowing shifting from a “poor” person food to a viable food options (and a highly nutritious one!).

Gus Le Breton, CEO of Bio-Innovation Zimbabwe, explains this shift, along with the economic opportunities that Baobab provides in the video below:

Gus le Breton on Baobab, economic opportunity, and nutrition

 


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Vote for a healthier world…three times a day.

  Happy Earth Day from all of us at Bumbleroot! Over the past year, we’ve come across a few facts that shocked us. Did you know: - The agriculture sector uses 70% of our earth’s accessible freshwater? - One-third of greenhouse gas emissions come from agriculture? - Food packaging accounts for about one-third of municipal waste in the United States? The design of our food system greatly impacts the health of our earth and our bodies. And there are thousands of ways we can do better. Water use can be reduced by fixing leaky irrigation systems and growing environment-appropriate plants. Synthetic fertilizer can be repl

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BR_profile

 

Happy Earth Day from all of us at Bumbleroot!

Over the past year, we’ve come across a few facts that shocked us.

Did you know:

– The agriculture sector uses 70% of our earth’s accessible freshwater?

– One-third of greenhouse gas emissions come from agriculture?

– Food packaging accounts for about one-third of municipal waste in the United States?

The design of our food system greatly impacts the health of our earth and our bodies. And there are thousands of ways we can do better. Water use can be reduced by fixing leaky irrigation systems and growing environment-appropriate plants. Synthetic fertilizer can be replaced with organic fertilizer, compost, or manure. Farmers can cut pesticide use by creating habitats that support beneficial insects (those that eat the bad ones). Food packaging can be redesigned to produce less waste.

Luckily, we get to vote for the food system we want three times a day – or for some of us who really like to eat…many more! We can choose to eat more veggies and fruits (which for the most part, use less water and energy than other food choices), eat at restaurants that source local or sustainably grown food, choose organic at the grocery store, or join a CSA to support local organic agriculture.

At Bumbleroot, we’re working to provide you with more ways to choose a way of eating and living that is healthier for you and the world. In July, we’ll be launching our first product – a tasty drink mix with all organic ingredients. Coconut water loaded with electrolytes and Baobab, an African superfruit, jam-packed with antixidants (10X more than Acai or Goji berries) are combined with organic fruits and herbs to provide a delicious, nutritious drink.

We pack the drink powder in pocket-sized packaging that can go anywhere you go and can be added into your reusable water bottle or glass. No more plastic bottles to throw away or to get lost under the seat of your car. We source from farmers using sustainable farming and harvesting practices – ensuring that our drinks are good for you and the planet.

Best of all, we will reinvest in these farming communities by giving back a percentage of our proceeds so that they can continue to grow healthy, sustainable food.

We can’t wait for you to try these drinks and to let us know what you think. Meanwhile, we want to continue a dialogue with you about the choices you make to live a healthy life that supports a healthy planet. How do you vote with your food?

– Sara

 

 

Sources:

Clay, J. (2004) World Agriculture and the Environment: A Commodity-by-Commodity Guide to Impacts and Practices Island Press via WWF

Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR)

GreenDustries.com


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