Bumbleroot’s Story

Whether you've been part of the Bumbleroot community for awhile or are brand new, we are so glad you're here. We hope you love our products, and today we also wanted to share our storyand why we do what we do. From our Founder, Sara: Seven years ago, I left a corporate job in Chicago to move to Zimbabwe. Years before, I had been a policy advisor to a U.S. Senator on agriculture issues, and I knew that: 

  • 1/2 of the world lives on $2.50 a day or less. 
  • The majority of those people engage in small scale agriculture. 
  • Conventional farming methods (utilizing expensive synthetic fertilizer and pesticides) were being promoted to these farmers in developing countries.
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Whether you’ve been part of the Bumbleroot community for awhile or are brand new, we are so glad you’re here.

We hope you love our products, and today we also wanted to share our storyand why we do what we do.

From our Founder, Sara:

Seven years ago, I left a corporate job in Chicago to move to Zimbabwe. Years before, I had been a policy advisor to a U.S. Senator on agriculture issues, and I knew that: 

  • 1/2 of the world lives on $2.50 a day or less. 
  • The majority of those people engage in small scale agriculture. 
  • Conventional farming methods (utilizing expensive synthetic fertilizer and pesticides) were being promoted to these farmers in developing countries.
  • Agriculture had the potential to impact climate change (both negatively and positively – in a big way).

But I also knew there was only so much I could learn from reading. I wanted to be on the ground, and meet these farmers and see for myself how agriculture could be used as a force for good: for higher incomes, for better nutrition, for better soil and water. 

The pull to Africa grew stronger and stronger, and in 2010, I found myself on a plane heading to a country I’d never been to, where I didn’t know another person. I remember thinking while I was on the plane that this was either the best or worst decision of my life. 

I arrived shortly after the country begun to use the U.S. dollar as currency after a run of trillion percent inflation.  There was so little currency circulating, that the dollars that were being used were used over and over and looked like they had been thrown in the mud, crinkled up, and then air-dried. After handling the cash, it was imperative to wash your hands.

Just a few years earlier, the country had been the “bread basket of Africa” – producing and exporting the food that was consumed throughout Africa and Europe. Land reform and redistribution (too long to cover here, but in short – it was violent and poorly executed), had left the most productive land unused (and disputed), while small farmers were working to try to feed themselves on less than prime land (and usually on just a few acres) and in the midst of a recovering economy.


The agriculture industry and NGOs in the country were working together to figure out a way to bring these small farmers into the food value chain. It was in the interest of everyone – food processors needed ingredients to produce food products, farmers needed income, seed producers needed to sell seeds, etc. 

I was working with the agriculture industry through an NGO and we all had the best of intentions and wanted these small farmers to be able to grow more food. Prevalent thinking was that the best way for farmers to grow more food was to use certain seeds, use a certain amount of fertilizer, and a certain amount of fertilizer and voila – in a season there would be corn, wheat, or soy. 

While we were working out the difficult puzzle of how small farmers could afford seeds, fertilizers, and pesticides when only farming a few acres, I was coming across amazing wild harvested foods in the rural areas. The King (or Queen) of these wild foods, was the Baobab fruit. Growing on majestic and gnarly trees that were hundreds to thousands of year old, these fruits had been traditionally used as food, drink, and medicine in the villages. 

Recent studies showed that the fruit had more antioxidants than acai or goji berries, was high in Vitamin C, and was a great source of dietary fiber. When the fruit was ripe, it fell to the ground. It cost nothing to pick up and harvest. Because it was readily available, it had at some point become considered “poor people food” and had a stigma attached to it. While children readily ate the candy-like fruit, adults shunned it. 

But what if the baobab fruit could be harvested and made into products? Local harvesters could receive income with no investment; the ancient trees would have economic value, further protecting them from being cut down (for example – for a powerline for a mine – this happened); and more people could benefit from the fantastic nutritional profile of the fruit.

The only thing missing in the equation was connecting the baobab fruit and consumers. I ended up moving back to the U.S. and founded Bumbleroot to do just that. But I had never created a food product before. I knew I wanted it to be healthy. I knew I wanted the packaging to be as low-impact to the environment as possible, and I wanted to make sure we were supporting our sourcing communities.

It’s been a long journey, but this is what we’ve learned:

  • We can create products that are not only healthy, but are nutritionally dense and easy to incorporate into our everyday lives. 
  • We can celebrate and feature unique ingredients that promote biodiversity in our food supply chain and protect these plants going forward (did you know the world has lost 94% of its seed diversity in the last century). 
  • We can find and use ingredients that meet our level of integrity – in their most natural state possible, sustainably farmed or harvested, enhancing soil rather than degrading it, and providing a fair price to the people who grow or harvest the food.
  • We can use packaging that is less impactful for the environment and less wasteful. Our drink packets aren’t biodegradeable (yet), but produce less waste than the 80% of bottles that are thrown away. 
  • We can support our harvesters and farmers. In addition to paying fair prices, we are reinvesting a percentage of revenue back into oursupplying communities. This past year, that money went to purchasing books for the schools (voted on by the community). The income is making a difference in peoples lives and is helping pay for school fees, clinic visits, and wells.
  • Traditional foods are making a comeback. Throughout the world, local communities are rediscovering local plants and foods and are reintegrating them back into their diets and culture. In Zimbabwe, oursupplying communities are now consuming more Baobab after realizing that others were paying a high price for it.
  • We can show the food industry that packaged food can be created in a different way – in a way that supports the environment – featuring ingredients that support soil health and reduce carbon emissions; enhances health; and reduces packaging waste.
  • And, we are also learning, that our community is craving more community and information around healthy, sustainable, and biodiverse food

To that end, we have created a Facebook group: Bumbleroot Cafe that allows for a sharing of information and conversation on healthy food, sustainable supply chains, growing our own food, and unique recipes and stories that celebrate culture and geography. Join here. 

We have more products to come and more stories to share. Thank you for being a part of our journey.

Sara


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The World’s Oldest Living Tree – And Its Healing Secrets

When I saw my first Baobab tree in Zimbabwe, I stood in front of it in awe. The tree gave me a “feeling”…I had never even heard of the tree, but upon first glance I knew there was something different about this tree, something very special. The first thing I noticed was its size. The tree is huge — it’s so huge that houses have been built inside the trunk. And then I noticed how different it looked — odd and beautiful at the same time…the branches are gnarly and look like roots that have been torn out of the ground. The Baobab Tree sits in the center of many villages in Afr

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Baobab harvesters under that Baobab Tree

When I saw my first Baobab tree in Zimbabwe, I stood in front of it in awe. The tree gave me a “feeling”…I had never even heard of the tree, but upon first glance I knew there was something different about this tree, something very special.

The first thing I noticed was its size. The tree is huge — it’s so huge that houses have been built inside the trunk. And then I noticed how different it looked — odd and beautiful at the same time…the branches are gnarly and look like roots that have been torn out of the ground.

The Baobab Tree sits in the center of many villages in Africa and is referred to as the “Tree of Life”. It holds deep spiritual significance to the communities that live around it. Stories of the baobab are as old as man, so it’s only fitting that the word baobab literally means “the time when man began”.

Rights of passage, spiritual ceremonies, village meetings, and shade seeking happen beneath these massive trees that are hundreds to thousands of years old, and they are so revered in their communities that many trees receive human names or become known as Um, which means mother. It is believed that the spirits of ancestors become a part of the trees and provide the nourishment that comes the water they store (a tree can store up to 30,000 gallons of water at once), their leaves, their seeds, and especially the dried pulp found in their fruit.

Child eating Baobab fruit

The fruit pulp is traditionally used medicinally to treat stomach aches, fevers, and malaria. Within the villages, it is also widely thought to cure hangovers and is used as a pain reliever for aches and pains, as well as arthritis. A UN study found that the pulp mixed with water was more effective in rehydrating children with severe diarrhea than World Health Organization remedies. It is also commonly used as a milk substitute.

Given the nutritional benefits, consumers around the world are purchasing the baobab powder, which is providing much needed income to the communities that live around Baobab trees. Harvestors sustainably harvest the fruit when it falls to the ground and the pulp is ground up to make a powder that can be added to smoothies, pancakes, and anything that would benefit from its tart and tangy taste.

Recent nutritional studies have given further insight into the fruit’s nutritional benefits which include:

More antioxidants than acai or Goji berries. It blows nearly every other superfood out of the water according to its ORAC score. Antioxidants protect our cells from damage caused by free radicals.

Nutrient-dense heavy-hitter. Baobab has potassium, Vitamin C, and is a source of Vitamin B6, magnesium, and calcium.

Immune boosting. Baobab fruit has an incredible amount of Vitamin C with 3-5 times the amount of an orange. One serving of Baobab powder (two tablespoons) has 25% of your daily recommended value of Vitamin C.

Prebiotic. A healthy gut is now recognized as being crucial to optimal health. You’ve heard of probiotics, but just as important are prebiotics which help that good bacteria grow in your gut. One serving of Baobab powder also has 24% of your daily recommended dietary fiber which aids in digestion.

Fiber-heavy. Baobab fruit is almost 50% fiber, half of which is soluble. Soluble fiber can help control blood glucose levels, improve blood cholesterol levels and heart health, help you feel fuller for longer, reduce visceral fat and slow down digestion. Soluble fiber could also help decrease the likelihood of insulin resistance.

Given these nutritional benefits, consumers around the world are purchasing the baobab powder, which is providing much needed income to the communities that live around Baobab trees. Harvestors sustainably harvest the fruit when it falls to the ground and the pulp is ground up to make a powder that can be added to smoothies, pancakes, and anything that would benefit from its tart and tangy taste.

Baobab fruit opened

Harvesters, who are mostly women, are using the income to pay for school fees, to buy wells, and to generally improve their quality of life.

And now that the trees also have an economic value in addition to the spiritual and nutritional value in the communities, they are being protected to an even greater extent, meaning that man (and woman) can give back to the tree that’s given so much to them.

I created Bumbleroot to get more Baobab out in the world and to provide more economic opportunities for the women (and men) who harvest the baobab. We’re committed to dreaming up and creating unique and healthy products using baobab and other wild harvested foods from around the world. Check out our baobab powder and other products at www.bumblerootfoods.com

~Sara


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Five new ways to drink Bumbleroot

"Put a lime in the coconut [water] and and drink them both up.." is just one of the ways Bumbleroot customers have been putting a twist on the tried and tested, "just add water" way of consuming our drink mixes. We've compiled five of our favorite ways that Bumbleroot customers are drinking their Bumbleroot (and a few we've tried and loved): 1) Add lemon (or lime) - a little acid can bring out a lot of flavor and the health benefits of lime and lemon are great - while they are "acidic" outside of the body - in the body they are "alkaline" and can help balance our PH levels and counter the acidity we get from processed foods and meat.

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“Put a lime in the coconut [water] and and drink them both up..” is just one of the ways Bumbleroot customers have been putting a twist on the tried and tested, “just add water” way of consuming our drink mixes.

We’ve compiled five of our favorite ways that Bumbleroot customers are drinking their Bumbleroot (and a few we’ve tried and loved):

1) Add lemon (or lime) – a little acid can bring out a lot of flavor and the health benefits of lime and lemon are great – while they are “acidic” outside of the body – in the body they are “alkaline” and can help balance our PH levels and counter the acidity we get from processed foods and meat.

2) Create a blender-less smoothie – there are so many things that you can add to your drink mix without using a blender – try bee pollen (one of our favorites – with the Blueberry flavor), cacao nibs, chia seeds, etc for a little extra something, something in your drink.

3) Try it hot – as in, boil up some water hot. Make the drinks into a tea – especially good with the blueberry and lemongrass flavors.

4) Just add a banana (and ice) and put it in the blender – great with all of the flavors – an instant, easy smoothie – kids especially like this one!

5) Make a cocktail by adding some vodka or rum – tested by a few Bumbleroot customers. Works especially well with the Pineapple Mint flavor.


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The Baobab Tree: Legend, lore, and medicinal benefits

The baobab tree is a huge, gnarly tree that looks like it’s been ripped out of the ground and turned upside down. Grown throughout Africa, the tree is treasured in its communities – as a place of shade, as a spiritual meeting place, and for the many uses of its fruit, seeds, leaves, and bark. Some baobab trees are over 6000 years old, making them some of the oldest living plants in the world. The baobab tree holds a special place in African legends and folklore. In one story (told in many variations), the baobab was jealous of more beautiful trees, and God turned the tree upside down because of the tree’s lack of gratitu

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The baobab tree is a huge, gnarly tree that looks like it’s been ripped out of the ground and turned upside down. Grown throughout Africa, the tree is treasured in its communities – as a place of shade, as a spiritual meeting place, and for the many uses of its fruit, seeds, leaves, and bark. Some baobab trees are over 6000 years old, making them some of the oldest living plants in the world.

The baobab tree holds a special place in African legends and folklore. In one story (told in many variations), the baobab was jealous of more beautiful trees, and God turned the tree upside down because of the tree’s lack of gratitude. In another legend, the hyena was given the tree as a gift, and ended up planting it upside down.

The tree’s treasured status is also due in large part to its many nutritional benefits. In traditional medicine, the baobab fruit pulp has been used for thousands of years to reduce fevers, to treat pain, to fight infection, as an anti-inflammatory, and to treat diarrhea and dysentery. It has also been used, historically, to treat measles and smallpox. Recent studies provide more evidence to support the fruit’s place as the “king of the superfoods”.

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Some of the most powerful attributes of the fruit found in studies, include:

– Antioxidants (more antioxidants of acai or goji berries)

– Anti-inflammatory properties

– Fever reducing effects

– Analgesic properties (pain relief)

– Anti-microbial properties

– Anti-viral activity

– Hepaprotective properties (protection from liver damage)

– Anti-diarrhea activity

In addition, the baobab pulp is a source of vitamin C (25% DV in one serving), dietary fiber, magnesium, and potassium.

Want to try out the this fruit from the “tree of life?” Try out our 100% Organic Baobab Fruit Pulp, with free shipping (for a limited time). Find recipes for smoothies and more at http://bumblerootfoods.com/category/recipes/.

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Source of attribute information:

“A review of baobab (Adansonia digita) products: Effect of processing techniques, medicinal properties & uses”, Kabore.


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The African Philosophy that has the Power to Change Lives

In Southern Africa, there is a beautiful concept called Ubuntu…. It has been translated as “I am, because you are,” “I am; because of you,” or “I am what I am because of who we all are.” Ubuntu represents the interconnectedness of humans and the communities in which we live and thrive.  We are who we are because of other people.  Embracing Ubuntu means we acknowledge being part of a greater whole. At Bumbleroot, this concept is at the core of our mission. Our ingredients are expertly sourced by harvesters and farmers around the world who a

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In Southern Africa, there is a beautiful concept called Ubuntu….

It has been translated as “I am, because you are,” “I am; because of you,” or “I am what I am because of who we all are.”

Ubuntu represents the interconnectedness of humans and the communities in which we live and thrive.  We are who we are because of other people.  Embracing Ubuntu means we acknowledge being part of a greater whole.

At Bumbleroot, this concept is at the core of our mission.

Our ingredients are expertly sourced by harvesters and farmers around the world who are committed to sustainable practices that will leave the world a better place for all of us

We are committed to paying these harvesters and farmers a fair wage so that they can support their families and contribute to their communities

We reinvest a portion of our revenues into our supplying communities to strengthen their communities and our supply chain, and

Our products are nutritious and made from real, pronounceable ingredients – helping you live your best life so that you can help others live their best lives.

What does Ubuntu mean to you?

To learn more:

Watch this TEDTalk by South African Safari guide Boyd Varty to learn more about Ubuntu and his memories of Nelson Mandela who embodied the concept and gave us the power to recognize and understand that each of us is responsible for the well being of ourselves and of others.

http://new.ted.com/talks/boyd_varty_what_i_learned_from_nelson_mandela

About Bumbleroot:

Bumbleroot creates healthy and delicious beverages and snacks that include unique, sustainably-sourced superfood ingredients from around the world.  Our first product is a Coconut Water and Baobab Drink Mix that provides everyday hydration, antioxidants, and nutrients in a convenient pocket-sized pouch.  Learn more about us at: bumblerootfoods.com

Baobab is an African superfruit with more antioxidants than acai or goji berries.  It’s also a source of Vitamin C, magnesium, and potassium and is one of the most alkaline foods available.


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10 things you didn’t know about the Baobab fruit

  1. The Baobab fruit has more antioxidants that acai or goji berries.  It blows nearly every other superfood out of the water according to its ORAC score.  This heavy hitter also has potassium, magnesium, calcium, and Vitamin C.
  2. How to pronounce Baobab. There is no agreed to pronunciation. Even in Africa where it's grown, people pronounce it differently.  The most common pronunciations are: Bow-bob, Bow-bab, Bay-o-bob, and Bay-o-bab.  Try them out and pick your favorite.
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10 things to know about baobab

  1. The Baobab fruit has more antioxidants that acai or goji berries.  It blows nearly every other superfood out of the water according to its ORAC score.  This heavy hitter also has potassium, magnesium, calcium, and Vitamin C.
  2. How to pronounce Baobab. There is no agreed to pronunciation. Even in Africa where it’s grown, people pronounce it differently.  The most common pronunciations are: Bow-bob, Bow-bab, Bay-o-bob, and Bay-o-bab.  Try them out and pick your favorite.
  3. It’s super alkaline. For our bodies to function optimally, we should make sure that we have an alkaline PH blood level.  How do we do this? By eating highly alkaline foods.  Baobab is one of the highest alkaline foods available with a a PRAL rating of -52.
  4. It’s an amazing source of dietary fiber and vitamin C.  One serving (~two tablespoons) has 25% of your daily recommended value of Vitamin C and 24% of your daily recommended dietary fiber.
  5. And…it acts as a prebiotic.  That is not a typo.  You’ve heard of probiotics, but just as important are prebiotics which help that good bacteria grow in your gut.  The fiber in the baobab fruit has prebiotic properties.
  6. The Baobab tree is one one of the most gnarly trees you have ever seen.  Also known as the “tree of life”, it looks like it’s been torn out of the ground and turned upside down.  And some of the trees are so big that they have been carved out and have bars inside of them.
  7. The tree is grown in the poorest areas of Africa.  Baobab trees grow in the driest areas in Africa, which are usually also the poorest areas.  Income opportunities are scarce and harvesting Baobab can provide the people who live in these areas the funds to improve their quality of life.
  8. It’s harvested sustainably.  When the fruit is ripe, it falls to the ground and is picked up by harvesters.  No damage is done to the tree.  In fact, certain practices that harm the tree (like shaving the bark to create rugs) are prohibited in the areas that harvest Baobab fruit for income.  So harvesting the fruit actually helps save the trees.
  9. Cyclists and other athletes love it. Whether it’s the antioxidants or the other vitamins and minerals, athletes adding Baobab to their diets are enjoying increased energy and lessened recovery times.  Ironman Matt White says.  “I used baobab in all my smoothies in training leading up to the Ironman race.  It provided sustained energy throughout the day, even after intense workout sessions.”
  10. How to eat it. The fruit comes in raw, powdered form.  It’s ready to add to smoothies, salad dressings, on oatmeal, to anything chocolate and more.  Its sweet and tangy taste pairs amazingly with honey..

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Eat Well and Do Good – An African superfood gift pack featuring Baobab and Moringa from Bumbleroot and Kuli Kuli.

To help someone in need, what do you do? Often, we think we must give oodles of money or time to help those in need. But where does that money go? How can you afford that time? Concerns like these can make issues of poverty and malnutrition seem insurmountable, and so often we end up doing nothing at all… Here’s a solution. Don’t sweat saving the world in one fell swoop. Instead, contribute to a bigger cause by buying products that responsibly lift up those in need. Con

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To help someone in need, what do you do?

Often, we think we must give oodles of money or time to help those in need. But where does that money go? How can you afford that time? Concerns like these can make issues of poverty and malnutrition seem insurmountable, and so often we end up doing nothing at all…

Here’s a solution.

Don’t sweat saving the world in one fell swoop. Instead, contribute to a bigger cause by buying products that responsibly lift up those in need. Conscientious health food companies Bumbleroot and Kuli Kuli have teamed up to let you do just that. This holiday season, take advantage of our nutrient-packed gift pack featuring Bumbleboot Baobab Drink Mixes and Kuli Kuli Superfood Bars with Moringa. These superfood products will help your body, while our companies’ business models help those in need.

Purchases increase incomes in Africa.

Nutrient-packed superfoods Baobab and Moringa are purchased from low-income communities in Africa committed to sustainable farming and harvesting practices. Your purchase helps increase their income and also encourages these men and women to incorporate these superfoods into their own diets, helping to combat the malnutrition that is rife in their communities. Learn more here.

Helping those in need has never been so easy. Or healthy.

The Eat Well and Do Good gift pack is available for a limited time this holiday season. Click here to help those in need by getting your healthy drinks and snacks.

Baobab

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The baobab fruit comes from the Baobab tree – a gnarly tree that looks like it’s been torn out of the ground and turned upside down. Also known as the “tree of life”, it’s often grown in the most drought prone and poorest areas in Africa.

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The fruit pulp is in powder-form when the fruit is opened.  The pulp contains 10x more antioxidants than acai or goji berry and is a source of vitamin C, dietary fiber, potassium, and magnesium.

Moringa

moringa-oleifera

Moringa au marchÇ (7)

The tiny leaves of the Moringa oleifera tree may be the world’s most nutritious green with high levels of protein, calcium, iron, Vitamin C and Vitamin A. Once eaten by the ancient Romans, Greeks and Egyptians, moringa leaves have been used in traditional medicine passed down for centuries in many cultures. More recently, the modern scientific community has begun to validate many of these claims with over 1300 studies, articles and publications on moringa. Kuli Kuli is the first company to retail ready-to-eat moringa products.

Bumbleroot

Bumbleroot creates tasty, healthy beverage food products from unique, organic, sustainably-sourced ingredients.  Bumbleroot creates markets for these ingredients – getting them into the hands of health-conscious consumers – while providing income to low-income communities throughout the world and encouraging sustainable agriculture

Bumbleroot’s first product line is a single serving powdered drink mix featuring organic fair trade coconut water, organic baobab, and real fruit and herb powders for flavoring. The superfood-filled drink mix delights the taste buds and is easy to take on the go for all sorts of play – traveling, cycling, hiking, yoga, etc.

Bumbleroot was born when founder Sara Andrews came across the baobab fruit while living and volunteering in Zimbabwe with the NGO TechnoServe.  Baobab is grown in drought-prone areas that often have few income opportunities.  Creating a market for baobab creates income opportunities for the people who live in the areas where the baobab tree grows.

Kuli Kuli

Kuli Kuli is the first company to introduce moringa, a unique superfood, to the U.S. market in the form of a food product. Our first moringa product is a gluten-free nutrition bar full of simple, wholesome ingredients and a nutritious burst of moringa. We form women-owned farming cooperatives in West Africa to grow moringa and use it to improve the health of their communities. By incentivizing women to use moringa and paying fair trade wages, Kuli Kuli is improving livelihoods and health.

“As a Peace Corps Volunteer in Niger, I saw first-hand the impact that moringa can have on improving nutrition. I came up with the idea to support women’s cooperatives to grow more moringa to nourish their communities and earn a livelihood by selling a portion of their harvests in the United States in the form of delicious Kuli Kuli Bars,” said Lisa Curtis, Kuli Kuli’s Founder and CEO.

Kuli Kuli Bars are gluten-free, vegan and made with just a few simple all-natural ingredients. They are low in calories but contain high amounts of fiber, protein and vitamins. Kuli Kuli has tested their bars at farmer’s markets in Oakland to resounding success.

Follow Bumbleroot and Sara Andrews on Twitter: @bumblerootfoods @sara_g_andrews

Follow Kuli Kuli and Lisa Curtis on Twitter: @kulikulibar @lisacurtis

Follow Bumbleroot on Facebook

Follow Kuli Kuli on Facebook

www.bumblerootfoods.com

www.kulikulibar.com



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Can Superfoods Help Solve Malnutrition?

Throughout Africa, there are pockets of areas that are habitually drought-prone.  With little access to water or income opportunities, malnourishment is a serious problem.  According to Save the Children, "malnutrition is an underlying cause of death of 2.6 million children each year -- one third of the global total of children's deaths." In areas with extreme weather (drought, heat, cold), mother nature has addressed this problem by creating superfood plants.  Many superfoods come from areas where the plants have had to work extra hard to survive.  Protecting themselves from extreme weather by creating phytochemicals, these plants c

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Throughout Africa, there are pockets of areas that are habitually drought-prone.  With little access to water or income opportunities, malnourishment is a serious problem.  According to Save the Children, “malnutrition is an underlying cause of death of 2.6 million children each year — one third of the global total of children’s deaths.”

In areas with extreme weather (drought, heat, cold), mother nature has addressed this problem by creating superfood plants.  Many superfoods come from areas where the plants have had to work extra hard to survive.  Protecting themselves from extreme weather by creating phytochemicals, these plants can provide much-needed nutritional benefits to the people who live in the areas where they grow.

Baobab is a tree that grows in Africa’s most arid regions.  The superfruit from the tree contains all essential amino acides, antioxidants, dietary fiber, calcium, vitamin C, potassium, and magnesium.

Unfortunately, baobab and other local foods, with are jam-packed with antioxidants, vitamins, and minerals are often shunned for being too “traditional” or as foods that are for “poor” people.  Even when in scarce supply, food can be a status symbol, and eating purchased maize (corn) mean instead of free and readily available baobab, indicates a level of upward mobility that is a sense of pride.

Luckily, in some areas, there is a shift in this thinking and it’s starting at Whole Foods and your local organic food stores.  The demand for superfoods from the United States, Europe, and Asia is giving these foods value in the communities from which they are harvested.  Now that there is a dollar amount associated with baobab, it’s slowing shifting from a “poor” person food to a viable food options (and a highly nutritious one!).

Gus Le Breton, CEO of Bio-Innovation Zimbabwe, explains this shift, along with the economic opportunities that Baobab provides in the video below:

Gus le Breton on Baobab, economic opportunity, and nutrition

 


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Vote for a healthier world…three times a day.

  Happy Earth Day from all of us at Bumbleroot! Over the past year, we’ve come across a few facts that shocked us. Did you know: - The agriculture sector uses 70% of our earth’s accessible freshwater? - One-third of greenhouse gas emissions come from agriculture? - Food packaging accounts for about one-third of municipal waste in the United States? The design of our food system greatly impacts the health of our earth and our bodies. And there are thousands of ways we can do better. Water use can be reduced by fixing leaky irrigation systems and growing environment-appropriate plants. Synthetic fertilizer can be repl

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Happy Earth Day from all of us at Bumbleroot!

Over the past year, we’ve come across a few facts that shocked us.

Did you know:

– The agriculture sector uses 70% of our earth’s accessible freshwater?

– One-third of greenhouse gas emissions come from agriculture?

– Food packaging accounts for about one-third of municipal waste in the United States?

The design of our food system greatly impacts the health of our earth and our bodies. And there are thousands of ways we can do better. Water use can be reduced by fixing leaky irrigation systems and growing environment-appropriate plants. Synthetic fertilizer can be replaced with organic fertilizer, compost, or manure. Farmers can cut pesticide use by creating habitats that support beneficial insects (those that eat the bad ones). Food packaging can be redesigned to produce less waste.

Luckily, we get to vote for the food system we want three times a day – or for some of us who really like to eat…many more! We can choose to eat more veggies and fruits (which for the most part, use less water and energy than other food choices), eat at restaurants that source local or sustainably grown food, choose organic at the grocery store, or join a CSA to support local organic agriculture.

At Bumbleroot, we’re working to provide you with more ways to choose a way of eating and living that is healthier for you and the world. In July, we’ll be launching our first product – a tasty drink mix with all organic ingredients. Coconut water loaded with electrolytes and Baobab, an African superfruit, jam-packed with antixidants (10X more than Acai or Goji berries) are combined with organic fruits and herbs to provide a delicious, nutritious drink.

We pack the drink powder in pocket-sized packaging that can go anywhere you go and can be added into your reusable water bottle or glass. No more plastic bottles to throw away or to get lost under the seat of your car. We source from farmers using sustainable farming and harvesting practices – ensuring that our drinks are good for you and the planet.

Best of all, we will reinvest in these farming communities by giving back a percentage of our proceeds so that they can continue to grow healthy, sustainable food.

We can’t wait for you to try these drinks and to let us know what you think. Meanwhile, we want to continue a dialogue with you about the choices you make to live a healthy life that supports a healthy planet. How do you vote with your food?

– Sara

 

 

Sources:

Clay, J. (2004) World Agriculture and the Environment: A Commodity-by-Commodity Guide to Impacts and Practices Island Press via WWF

Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research (CGIAR)

GreenDustries.com


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